Australian politicians’ beliefs about climate change: political partisanship and political ideology

Fielding, Kelly S., Head, Brian W., Laffan, Warren, Western, Mark and Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove (2012) Australian politicians’ beliefs about climate change: political partisanship and political ideology. Environmental Politics, 21 5: 712-733.


Author Fielding, Kelly S.
Head, Brian W.
Laffan, Warren
Western, Mark
Hoegh-Guldberg, Ove
Title Australian politicians’ beliefs about climate change: political partisanship and political ideology
Journal name Environmental Politics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0964-4016
1743-8934
Publication date 2012-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/09644016.2012.698887
Volume 21
Issue 5
Start page 712
End page 733
Total pages 22
Editor Christopher Rootes
Anthony Zito
John Barry
Place of publication Abingdon, Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routledge
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract Despite the scientific consensus on anthropogenic climate change and its implications, there is considerably less certainty or strength of belief among the general public in some industrialised countries. One explanation for the lack of consensus is the partisan nature of political debate about climate change. A survey of Australian politicians demonstrates that political party affiliation and ideology have a powerful influence on climate change beliefs. Politicians from Labor and Green parties (centre-left and progressive parties) exhibited beliefs that were more consistent with scientific consensus about climate change than non-aligned or conservative leaders. Moreover, political ideology (left–right) emerged as the most important predictor of politicians’ climate change beliefs. These findings highlight the role of political partisanship and ideology in undermining consensus around climate change and suggest the need to build consensus through constructing climate change messages that appeal to closely held values and which advance the discussion of solutions along non-partisan lines.
Keyword Climate change beliefs
Political elites
Politicians
Political ideology
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Special Issue: Climate change, national politics and grassroots action

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Institute for Social Science Research - Publications
Global Change Institute Publications
Official 2013 Collection
 
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Created: Wed, 14 Nov 2012, 13:53:51 EST by Dr Kelly Fielding on behalf of ISSR - Research Groups