Ventilation distribution in rats: Part I - The effect of gas composition as measured with electrical impedance tomography

Dunster, Kimble R., Friese, Marlies, Fraser, John F., Cowin, Gary J. and Schibler, Andreas (2012) Ventilation distribution in rats: Part I - The effect of gas composition as measured with electrical impedance tomography. BioMedical Engineering OnLine, 11 4: 64.1-64.9. doi:10.1186/1475-925X-11-64

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Author Dunster, Kimble R.
Friese, Marlies
Fraser, John F.
Cowin, Gary J.
Schibler, Andreas
Total Author Count Override 5
Title Ventilation distribution in rats: Part I - The effect of gas composition as measured with electrical impedance tomography
Journal name BioMedical Engineering OnLine   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1475-925X
Publication date 2012-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/1475-925X-11-64
Volume 11
Issue 4
Start page 64.1
End page 64.9
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher BioMed Central
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract The measurement of ventilation distribution is currently performed using inhaled tracer gases for multiple breath inhalation studies or imaging techniques to quantify spatial gas distribution. Most tracer gases used for these studies have properties different from that of air. The effect of gas density on regional ventilation distribution has not been studied. This study aimed to measure the effect of gas density on regional ventilation distribution.

Methods
Ventilation distribution was measured in seven rats using electrical impedance tomography (EIT) in supine, prone, left and right lateral positions while being mechanically ventilated with either air, heliox (30% oxygen, 70% helium) or sulfur hexafluoride (20% SF6, 20% oxygen, 60% air). The effect of gas density on regional ventilation distribution was assessed.

Results
Gas density did not impact on regional ventilation distribution. The non-dependent lung was better ventilated in all four body positions. Gas density had no further impact on regional filling characteristics. The filling characteristics followed an anatomical pattern with the anterior and left lung showing a greater impedance change during the initial phase of the inspiration.

Conclusion
It was shown that gas density did not impact on convection dependent ventilation distribution in rats measured with EIT.
Keyword Electrical impedance tomography
Ventilation distribution
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes First published online: 9 September 2012 Article number64

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
Centre for Advanced Imaging Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 09 Nov 2012, 16:09:50 EST by Matthew Lamb on behalf of School of Medicine