Hendra virus: an emerging paramyxovirus in Australia

Mahalingam, Suresh, Herrero, Lara J., Playford, E. Geoffrey, Spann, Kirsten, Herring, Belinda, Rolph, Michael S., Middleton, Deborah, McCall, Bradley, Field, Hume and Wang, Lin-Fa (2012) Hendra virus: an emerging paramyxovirus in Australia. Lancet Infectious Diseases, 12 10: 799-807.


Author Mahalingam, Suresh
Herrero, Lara J.
Playford, E. Geoffrey
Spann, Kirsten
Herring, Belinda
Rolph, Michael S.
Middleton, Deborah
McCall, Bradley
Field, Hume
Wang, Lin-Fa
Total Author Count Override 10
Title Hendra virus: an emerging paramyxovirus in Australia
Journal name Lancet Infectious Diseases   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1473-3099
Publication date 2012-10
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/S1473-3099(12)70158-5
Volume 12
Issue 10
Start page 799
End page 807
Total pages 9
Place of publication London, England, U.K.
Publisher The Lancet Publishing Group
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract Hendra virus, first identified in 1994 in Queensland, is an emerging zoonotic pathogen gaining importance in Australia because a growing number of infections are reported in horses and people. The virus, a member of the family Paramyxoviridae (genus Henipavirus), is transmitted to horses by pteropid bats (fruit bats or flying foxes), with human infection a result of direct contact with infected horses. Case-fatality rate is high in both horses and people, and so far, more than 60 horses and four people have died from Hendra virus infection in Australia. Human infection is characterised by an acute encephalitic syndrome or relapsing encephalitis, for which no effective treatment is currently available. Recent identification of Hendra virus infection in a domestic animal outside the laboratory setting, and the large range of pteropid bats in Australia, underpins the potential of this virus to cause greater morbidity and mortality in both rural and urban populations and its importance to both veterinary and human health. Attempts at treatment with ribavirin and chloroquine have been unsuccessful. Education, hygiene, and infection control measures have hitherto been the mainstay of prevention, while access to monoclonal antibody treatment and development of an animal vaccine offer further opportunities for disease prevention and control.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
Clinical Medical Virology Centre Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 09 Nov 2012, 09:20:17 EST by Matthew Lamb on behalf of School of Medicine