Prenatal Vitamin D deficiency induces an early and more severe experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in the second generation

Fernandes de Abreu, Diana Andrea, Landel, Verena, Barnett, Adrian G., McGrath, John, Eyles, Darryl and Feron, Francois (2012) Prenatal Vitamin D deficiency induces an early and more severe experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in the second generation. International Journal of Molecular Sciences, 13 9: 10911-10919. doi:10.3390/ijms130910911


Author Fernandes de Abreu, Diana Andrea
Landel, Verena
Barnett, Adrian G.
McGrath, John
Eyles, Darryl
Feron, Francois
Title Prenatal Vitamin D deficiency induces an early and more severe experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis in the second generation
Journal name International Journal of Molecular Sciences   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1422-0067
Publication date 2012-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3390/ijms130910911
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 13
Issue 9
Start page 10911
End page 10919
Total pages 9
Place of publication Basel, Switzerland
Publisher MDPIAG
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract In a previous study, we demonstrated that mouse adult F1 offspring, exposed to a vitamin D deficiency during pregnancy, developed a less severe and delayed Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis (EAE), when compared with control offspring. We then wondered whether a similar response was observed in the subsequent generation. To answer this question, we assessed F2 females whose F1 parents (males or females) were vitamin D-deprived when developing in the uterus of F0 females. Unexpectedly, we observed that the vitamin D deficiency affecting the F0 pregnant mice induced a precocious and more severe EAE in the F2 generation. This paradoxical finding led us to assess its implications for the epidemiology of Multiple Sclerosis (MS) in humans. Using the REFGENSEP database for MS trios (the patient and his/her parents), we collected the parents' dates of birth and assessed a potential season of birth effect that could potentially be indicative of the vitamin D status of the pregnant grandmothers. A trend for a reduced number of births in the Fall for the parents of MS patients was observed but statistical significance was not reached. Further well powered studies are warranted to validate the latter finding.
Keyword Vitamin D experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis
Multiple sclerosis
Deficiency
Season of birth
Transgenerational
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
Official 2013 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 06 Nov 2012, 15:16:31 EST by Debra McMurtrie on behalf of Queensland Brain Institute