Children's physical activity and psychological health: the relevance of intensity

Parfitt, Gaynor, Pavey, Toby and Rowlands, Ann V. (2009) Children's physical activity and psychological health: the relevance of intensity. Acta Paediatrica, 98 6: 1037-1043.


Author Parfitt, Gaynor
Pavey, Toby
Rowlands, Ann V.
Title Children's physical activity and psychological health: the relevance of intensity
Journal name Acta Paediatrica   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0803-5253
1651-2227
Publication date 2009-06
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1651-2227.2009.01255.x
Volume 98
Issue 6
Start page 1037
End page 1043
Total pages 7
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract Aim: To examine the relevance of physical activity intensity when assessing the relationship between activity and psychological health in 9–10-year-old children.

Methods: Activity was assessed by accelerometry in 57 boys (n = 23) and girls (n = 34). Total activity and time spent in very light (≤1.9 METs) through to vigorous activity (≥6 METs) were recorded. Psychological health inventories to assess anxiety, depression and aspects of self-worth were completed.

Results: Time accumulated in very light activity had positive correlations with anxiety and depression (r > 0.30, p < 0.05) and negative correlations with aspects of physical self-worth (r > −0.29, p < 0.05). Time accumulated in vigorous activity had negative correlations with anxiety and behavioural conduct (r > −0.30, p < 0.05) and positive correlation with aspects of physical self-worth (r > 0.28, p < 0.05). Children spending over 4 h in very light intensity activity had more negative psychological profiles than children spending under 4 h at this intensity.

Conclusion: Aspects of psychological health were negatively correlated with very light intensity activity and positively correlated with vigorous intensity activity. Further research should investigate whether reducing time spent in very light intensity activity and increasing time spent in vigorous intensity activity improves psychological health in children.
Keyword Accelerometry
Anxiety
Depression
Self-worth
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Human Movement Studies Publications
 
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