Predictors of child post-concussion symptoms at 6 and 18 months following mild traumatic brain injury

Olsson, Katherine, Lloyd, Owen T., Le Brocque, Robyne M., McKinlay, Lynne, Anderson, Vicki A. and Kenardy, Justin A. (2013) Predictors of child post-concussion symptoms at 6 and 18 months following mild traumatic brain injury. Brain Injury, 27 2: 145-157. doi:10.3109/02699052.2012.729286

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Olsson, Katherine
Lloyd, Owen T.
Le Brocque, Robyne M.
McKinlay, Lynne
Anderson, Vicki A.
Kenardy, Justin A.
Title Predictors of child post-concussion symptoms at 6 and 18 months following mild traumatic brain injury
Journal name Brain Injury   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0269-9052
1362-301X
Publication date 2013-02
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.3109/02699052.2012.729286
Volume 27
Issue 2
Start page 145
End page 157
Total pages 13
Place of publication London, United Kingdom
Publisher Informa Healthcare
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: A proportion of children will experience persistent post-concussion symptoms (PCS) following a mild traumatic brain injury (mTBI). As persistent PCS may be maintained by pathological and psychological factors, this study aimed to describe and evaluate potential pre- and post-injury parent and child predictors of persistent PCS.

Methods: A total of 150 children with mTBI and their parents participated. Parents completed measures of their own distress and children’s PCS and health-related quality-of-life (HRQoL) at baseline (reflecting pre-injury function). These measures, as well as measures of children’s distress and cognitive function were administered at 6 and 18 months post-injury.

Results: Children’s PCS at 6 months post-injury were predicted by both pre-injury parent distress and children’s pre-injury PCS. At 18 months post-injury, children’s PCS were predicted by higher levels of parent distress and child PCS at 6 months post-injury, as well as poorer post-injury cognitive functioning. Change in PCS between 6–18 months post-injury was predicted by parent’s pre-injury anxiety and children’s HRQoL.

Conclusions: Children at risk of persistent PCS can be identified by higher levels of pre- and post-injury PCS, parent distress and poorer post-injury cognition. These factors should be addressed by interventions aimed at minimizing the occurrence and impact of child PCS.
Keyword Child
Post-concussion
Mild traumatic brain injury
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 15 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 19 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 09 Oct 2012, 14:19:39 EST by Chesne McGrath on behalf of Medicine - Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital