Virtual reality for acute pain reduction in adolescents undergoing burn wound care: a prospective randomized controlled trial

Kipping, Belinda, Rodger, Sylvia, Miller, Kate and Kimble, Roy M. (2012) Virtual reality for acute pain reduction in adolescents undergoing burn wound care: a prospective randomized controlled trial. Burns, 38 5: 650-657.


Author Kipping, Belinda
Rodger, Sylvia
Miller, Kate
Kimble, Roy M.
Title Virtual reality for acute pain reduction in adolescents undergoing burn wound care: a prospective randomized controlled trial
Journal name Burns   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0305-4179
1879-1409
Publication date 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.burns.2011.11.010
Volume 38
Issue 5
Start page 650
End page 657
Total pages 8
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract Background: Effective pain management remains a challenge for adolescents during conscious burn wound care procedures. Virtual reality (VR) shows promise as a non-pharmacological adjunct in reducing pain.

Aims: This study assessed off-the-shelf VR for (1) its effect on reducing acute pain intensity during adolescent burn wound care, and (2) its clinical utility in a busy hospital setting.

Methods: Forty-one adolescents (11-17 years) participated in this prospective randomized controlled trial. Acute pain outcomes including adolescent self-report, nursing staff behavioral observation, caregiver observation and physiological measures were collected. Length of procedure times and adolescent reactions were also recorded to inform clinical utility.

Results: Nursing staff reported a statistically significant reduction in pain scores during dressing removal, and significantly less rescue doses of Entonox given to those receiving VR, compared to those receiving standard distraction. For all other pain outcomes and length of treatment, there was a trend for lower pain scores and treatment times for those receiving VR, but these differences were not statistically significant.

Conclusion: Despite only minimal pain reduction achieved using off-the-shelf VR, other results from this trial and previous research on younger children with burns suggest a customized, adolescent and hospital friendly device may be more effective in pain reduction.
Keyword Adolescent
Burns
Distraction
Pain
Pediatric
Virtual reality
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

 
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Created: Mon, 08 Oct 2012, 12:52:04 EST by Professor Sylvia Rodger on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences