Developing primary students' argumentation skills in inquiry-based mathematics classrooms

Fielding-Wells, Jill and Makar, Katie (2012). Developing primary students' argumentation skills in inquiry-based mathematics classrooms. In: Jan van Aalst, Kate Thompson, Michael J. Jacobson and Peter Reimann, ICLS Conference Proceedings – Volume 2, Short Papers, Symposia, and Abstracts. 10th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: The Future of Learning, Sydney, Australia, (149-153). 2-6 July 2012.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Fielding-Wells, Jill
Makar, Katie
Title of paper Developing primary students' argumentation skills in inquiry-based mathematics classrooms
Conference name 10th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: The Future of Learning
Conference location Sydney, Australia
Conference dates 2-6 July 2012
Proceedings title ICLS Conference Proceedings – Volume 2, Short Papers, Symposia, and Abstracts
Journal name 10th International Conference of the Learning Sciences: The Future of Learning, ICLS 2012 - Proceedings
Place of Publication Sydney, Australia
Publisher International Society of the Learning Sciences (ISLS)
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9780578107042
Editor Jan van Aalst
Kate Thompson
Michael J. Jacobson
Peter Reimann
Volume 2
Start page 149
End page 153
Total pages 5
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Most educational research on argumentation comes from science, with argumentation in mathematics tending to focus on proof. We contend that argumentation can be used productively in learning mathematics even at the primary level. A research study was designed to explore children‘s development of argumentation in an Australian primary mathematics classroom. The classroom of 23 children (aged 9-10) had regularly used an inquiry-based approach to address extended, complex, ill-structured problems. The children‘s discussions and use of evidence is reported as they considered contentious media claims. The results of the design-based research study suggest that the children became proficient with Toulmin‘s argument framework (simplified). They were able to use this framework to plan, implement and defend the outcomes of a mathematical investigation they designed to provide evidence for or against the media claims. The paper highlights benefits and challenges with which student grappled while making and substantiating their final claims.
Keyword Argumentation skills
Mathematics classrooms
Inquiry based teaching
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Education Publications
 
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Created: Fri, 05 Oct 2012, 15:01:43 EST by Claire Backhouse on behalf of School of Education