Effects of ALA, EPA and DHA in high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rats

Poudyal, Hemant, Panchal, Sunil K., Ward, Leigh C. and Brown, Lindsay (2012) Effects of ALA, EPA and DHA in high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rats. Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry, 24 6: 1041-1052. doi:10.1016/j.jnutbio.2012.07.014


Author Poudyal, Hemant
Panchal, Sunil K.
Ward, Leigh C.
Brown, Lindsay
Title Effects of ALA, EPA and DHA in high-carbohydrate, high-fat diet-induced metabolic syndrome in rats
Journal name Journal of Nutritional Biochemistry   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0955-2863
1873-4847
Publication date 2012-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.jnutbio.2012.07.014
Volume 24
Issue 6
Start page 1041
End page 1052
Total pages 12
Place of publication New York, NY, United States
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract We compared the cardiovascular, hepatic and metabolic responses to individual dietary n-3 fatty acids (α-linolenic acid, ALA; eicosapentaenoic acid, EPA; and docosahexaenoic acid, DHA) in a high-carbohydrate, high-fatdiet-induced model of metabolicsyndrome in rats. Additionally, we measured fatty acid composition of plasma, adipose tissue, liver, heart and skeletal muscle in these rats. The same dosages of ALA and EPA/DHA produced different physiological responses to decrease the risk factors for metabolicsyndrome. ALA did not reduce total body fat but induced lipid redistribution away from the abdominal area and favorably improved glucose tolerance, insulin sensitivity, dyslipidemia, hypertension and left ventricular dimensions, contractility, volumes and stiffness. EPA and DHA increased sympathetic activation, reduced the abdominal adiposity and total body fat and attenuated insulin sensitivity, dyslipidemia, hypertension and left ventricular stiffness but not glucose tolerance. However, ALA, EPA and DHA all reduced inflammation in both the heart and the liver, cardiac fibrosis and hepatic steatosis. These effects were associated with complete suppression of stearoyl-CoA desaturase 1 activity. Since the physiological responses to EPA and DHA were similar, it is likely that the effects are mediated by DHA with EPA serving as a precursor. Also, ALA supplementation increased DHA concentrations but induced different physiological responses to EPA and DHA. This result strongly suggests that ALA has independent effects in metabolicsyndrome, not relying on its metabolism to DHA.
Keyword Metabolic syndrome
Omega-3
Fish oil
Chia oil
Cardiovascular
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes In Press, Corrected Proof

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
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Created: Fri, 05 Oct 2012, 13:19:55 EST by Mrs Louise Nimwegen on behalf of School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences