A proof of Clausius' theorem for time reversible deterministic microscopic dynamics

Evans, Denis J., Williams, Stephen R. and Searles, Debra J. (2011) A proof of Clausius' theorem for time reversible deterministic microscopic dynamics. Journal of Chemical Physics, 134 20: . doi:10.1063/1.3592531


Author Evans, Denis J.
Williams, Stephen R.
Searles, Debra J.
Title A proof of Clausius' theorem for time reversible deterministic microscopic dynamics
Journal name Journal of Chemical Physics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0021-9606
1089-7690
Publication date 2011-05
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1063/1.3592531
Volume 134
Issue 20
Total pages 7
Place of publication College Park, MD, United States
Publisher American Institute of Physics
Language eng
Formatted abstract In 1854 Clausius proved the famous theorem that bears his name by assuming the second “law” of thermodynamics. In the present paper we give a proof that requires no such assumption. Our proof rests on the laws of mechanics, a T-mixing property, an ergodic consistency condition, and on the axiom of causality. Our result relies on some recently derived theorems, such as the Evans-Searles and the Crooks fluctuation theorems and the recently discovered relaxation and dissipation theorems.
Keyword Free energy differences
Fluctuation theorem
Work relation
Systems
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ
Additional Notes Article #204113

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
Australian Institute for Bioengineering and Nanotechnology Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 5 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 34 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 05 Oct 2012, 13:10:26 EST by System User on behalf of School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences