A biogeographical assessment of anthropogenic threats to areas where different frog breeding groups occur in South Africa: implications for anuran conservation

Mokhatla, Mohlamatsane M., Measey, G. John, Chimimba, Christian T. and van Rensburg, Berndt J. (2012) A biogeographical assessment of anthropogenic threats to areas where different frog breeding groups occur in South Africa: implications for anuran conservation. Diversity and Distributions, 18 5: 470-480.


Author Mokhatla, Mohlamatsane M.
Measey, G. John
Chimimba, Christian T.
van Rensburg, Berndt J.
Title A biogeographical assessment of anthropogenic threats to areas where different frog breeding groups occur in South Africa: implications for anuran conservation
Journal name Diversity and Distributions   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1366-9516
1472-4642
Publication date 2012-05
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1111/j.1472-4642.2011.00870.x
Volume 18
Issue 5
Start page 470
End page 480
Total pages 11
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract Aim  To determine the spatial relationship between areas where different frog breeding groups occur and elevated anthropogenic activities, and the conservation implications thereof.
Location  South Africa.
Methods  Data on frog distribution ranges for the southern African sub-region were used to identify biogeographical areas within South Africa. A random draw technique was used to determine whether areas where different frog breeding groups occur were characterized by higher levels of anthropogenic threats than expected by chance. Four measures (human population density, percentage land transformation, percentage protected area and invasive alien plants richness) expected to reflect threats were analysed.
Results  Terrestrial-breeders were more often spatially associated with areas of threat than expected by chance in three of the seven biogeographical regions examined with land transformation and invasive alien plant richness being most significant. The south central was the only region where terrestrial-breeders were spatially congruent with protected areas. Areas where stream-breeders occur were spatially congruent with anthropogenic threats (with alien plants being most consistent) in five of the seven regions examined while protected areas were well represented in four of the seven regions. Non-significant results were found for permanent and temporary aquatic-breeders at both the national and the biogeographical scale.
Main conclusions  By analysing data at the sub-continental scale we were able to identify regional threats to amphibians traditionally classified at species-specific scales. Our study recognized land transformation and alien invasive plants as significant threats to areas important for the long-term breeding success of stream and terrestrial amphibians in South Africa. Areas where different breeding groups occur in the south-western Cape showed the greatest spatial congruence with the threats examined. Areas where terrestrial breeding frogs occur are not well represented in the current conservation network. This has important implications in addressing the current status of threats on amphibians in a biogeographical context.
Keyword Amphibians
Anthropogenic threats
Biogeographical scale
Life-history traits
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Non HERDC
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 1 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 2 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 103 Abstract Views  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 05 Oct 2012, 11:54:53 EST by System User on behalf of School of Biological Sciences