Identification of genes important for growth of asymptomatic Bacteriuria Escherichia coli in urine

Vejborg, Rebecca M., de Evgrafov, Mari R., Phan, Minh Duy, Totsika, Makrina, Schembri, Mark A. and Hancock, Viktoria (2012) Identification of genes important for growth of asymptomatic Bacteriuria Escherichia coli in urine. Infection and Immunity, 80 9: 3179-3188.


Author Vejborg, Rebecca M.
de Evgrafov, Mari R.
Phan, Minh Duy
Totsika, Makrina
Schembri, Mark A.
Hancock, Viktoria
Title Identification of genes important for growth of asymptomatic Bacteriuria Escherichia coli in urine
Journal name Infection and Immunity   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0019-9567
1098-5522
Publication date 2012-09
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1128/IAI.00473-12
Volume 80
Issue 9
Start page 3179
End page 3188
Total pages 10
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Society for Microbiology
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract Escherichia coli is the most important etiological agent of urinary tract infections (UTIs). Unlike uropathogenic E. coli, which causes symptomatic infections, asymptomatic bacteriuria (ABU) E. coli strains typically lack essential virulence factors and colonize the bladder in the absence of symptoms. While ABU E. coli can persist in the bladder for long periods of time, little is known about the genetic determinants required for its growth and fitness in urine. To identify such genes, we have employed a transposon mutagenesis approach using the prototypic ABU E. coli strain 83972 and the clinical ABU E. coli strain VR89. Six genes involved in the biosynthesis of various amino acids and nucleobases were identified (carB, argE, argC, purA, metE, and ilvC), and site-specific mutants were subsequently constructed in E. coli 83972 and E. coli VR89 for each of these genes. In all cases, these mutants exhibited reduced growth rates and final cell densities in human urine. The growth defects could be complemented in trans as well as by supplementation with the appropriate amino acid or nucleobase. When assessed in vivo in a mouse model, E. coli 83972carAB and 83972argC showed a significantly reduced competitive advantage in the bladder and/or kidney during coinoculation experiments with the parent strain, whereas 83972metE and 83972ilvC did not. Taken together, our data have identified several biosynthesis pathways as new important fitness factors associated with the growth of ABU E. coli in human urine.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published ahead of print: 2 July 2012.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
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Created: Thu, 04 Oct 2012, 14:16:54 EST by Mrs Louise Nimwegen on behalf of School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences