The Effects of Alcohol-Related Television Advertising and Individual Differences in Personality on Alcohol Expectancies and Immediate Urge to Drink

Jeanette Van Luyn (2012). The Effects of Alcohol-Related Television Advertising and Individual Differences in Personality on Alcohol Expectancies and Immediate Urge to Drink Professional Doctorate, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Jeanette Van Luyn
Thesis Title The Effects of Alcohol-Related Television Advertising and Individual Differences in Personality on Alcohol Expectancies and Immediate Urge to Drink
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2012-09-25
Thesis type Professional Doctorate
Supervisor Dr Natalie Loxton
Total pages 140
Total colour pages 3
Total black and white pages 137
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary The current study examined the effect of viewing different types of alcohol-related television advertising on immediate urge to drink and alcohol-related cognitions. The study aimed to integrate the role of individual differences in personality, as conceptualised in Gray’s Reinforcement Sensitivity Theory (RST), into the findings. 100 university students aged 18 to 32 years (Mage = 22.59 years) viewed a television segment embedded with either commercial alcohol advertisements, government endorsed anti-binge-drinking advertisements, or non-alcohol related neutral advertisements. Participants then completed a computerised implicit measure of alcohol expectancies (the ETask) that was embedded with either alcohol or non-alcohol beverage cues. Participants also completed self-report measures of the original and revised RST, explicit alcohol expectancies, immediate affective state, and current drinking behaviour. Subjective, immediate urge to drink was measured at baseline and after viewing the television segment and completing the ETask. The results revealed that while viewing commercial alcohol advertisements appeared to increase immediate desire to drink, they did not affect implicit or explicit endorsement of alcohol expectancies. Additionally, there was some evidence that government anti-binge drinking advertisements also increased immediate desire to drink, while not affecting implicit or explicit endorsement of alcohol expectancies. Finally, it was found that individual differences in sensitivity to reward had selective effects on reactivity to the alcohol-related advertisements, including ratings of urge to drink for emotion-regulation motives. This study contributes to current knowledge as to how alcohol-related advertising may affect drinking behavior on an individual, as well as population, level basis.

 
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Created: Tue, 25 Sep 2012, 08:58:59 EST by Jeanette Van Luyn on behalf of Faculty of Social & Behavioural Sciences