Effects of gender, indigenous status and remoteness to health services on the occurrence of assault-related injuries in children and adolescents

Irie, Fumiko, Lang, Jacelle, Kaltner, Melissa, Le Brocque, Robyne and Kenardy, Justin (2012) Effects of gender, indigenous status and remoteness to health services on the occurrence of assault-related injuries in children and adolescents. Injury, 43 11: 1873-1880. doi:10.1016/j.injury.2012.07.183


Author Irie, Fumiko
Lang, Jacelle
Kaltner, Melissa
Le Brocque, Robyne
Kenardy, Justin
Title Effects of gender, indigenous status and remoteness to health services on the occurrence of assault-related injuries in children and adolescents
Journal name Injury   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0020-1383
1879-0267
Publication date 2012
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.injury.2012.07.183
Open Access Status
Volume 43
Issue 11
Start page 1873
End page 1880
Total pages 8
Place of publication Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Elsevier
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background

Assault-related injury is a devastating consequence of violence and is a prominent cause of morbidity and mortality in young age. However, reliable data sources are scarce and there has been a paucity of studies examining possible predisposing factors on the incidence of assault-related injury.

Method


Logistic regression analyses were conducted to examine the effect of gender, indigenous status and remoteness to health services on sustaining assault-related injuries in patients aged 17 years and under by using data from the state-wide trauma registry in Queensland, Australia from 2005 to 2008.

Results


A total of 282 assault-related injury cases were identified. Indigenous females were at the highest risk of sustaining assault-related injuries (odds ratio (OR): 15.3, 95% confidence interval (CI): 8.17–28.6), followed by indigenous males (OR: 6.55, 95% CI: 3.60–11.9) and non-indigenous males (OR: 2.82, 95% CI: 1.78–4.47). Males were at a significantly higher risk than females in the group aged 13–17 years (OR: 2.11, 95% CI: 1.34–3.31). Living in a regional area was associated with a lower risk compared to major cities for non-indigenous people (OR: 0.59, 95% CI: 0.44–0.78). Indigenous people were at higher risk of sustaining an assault-related injury than non-indigenous people in regional areas (OR: 4.8, 95% CI: 3.14–7.42) and in remote areas (OR: 10.1, 95% CI: 2.64–38.69).

Conclusions


The current study provides evidence of interaction effects among the predisposing factors. Identifying these factors is important to conduct effective preventive measures and trauma management plans focussing on high-risk groups of assault-related injuries in young age.
Keyword Assault-related injuries
Children and adolescents
Gender
Indigenous status
Remoteness to health services
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Available online 10 August 2012

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 18 Sep 2012, 11:34:39 EST by Chesne McGrath on behalf of Medicine - Royal Brisbane and Women's Hospital