Growth and yield response of barley and chickpea to water stress under three environments in southeast Queensland. III. Water use efficiency, transpiration efficiency and soil evaporation

Thomas and Fukai, S. (1995) Growth and yield response of barley and chickpea to water stress under three environments in southeast Queensland. III. Water use efficiency, transpiration efficiency and soil evaporation. Australian Journal of Agricultural Research, 46 1: 49-60.


Author Thomas
Fukai, S.
Title Growth and yield response of barley and chickpea to water stress under three environments in southeast Queensland. III. Water use efficiency, transpiration efficiency and soil evaporation
Journal name Australian Journal of Agricultural Research   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0004-9409
1444-9838
Publication date 1995
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 46
Issue 1
Start page 49
End page 60
Total pages 12
Place of publication Collingwood, VIC, Australia
Publisher C S I R O Publishing
Language eng
Abstract Two cultivars of barley and one cultivar of chickpea were grown in both well-watered and water stress conditions in three experiments. Water use efficiency (biomass produced per unit evapotranspiration) was lower in chickpea than in barley, and between two barley cultivars it was higher in early-maturing Corvette than in late-maturing Triumph. These differences in water use efficiency were mostly related to the differences in transpiration efficiency (biomass produced per unit transpiration). The latter appeared to reflect the differences in biomass production under well-watered conditions, as similar differences were found in light use efficiency (biomass produced per unit of photosynthetically active radiation intercepted) among the three crops. Transpiration efficiency was inversely related to vapour pressure deficit of the air. In three experiments soil evaporation accounted for about 55% and 10-30% of total water use for chickpea and barley respectively during observation periods, when rainfall was excluded from the plots. Slow canopy development of chickpea was a reason for such a high proportion of soil evaporation, and this contributed to its lower water use efficiency compared to barley. The amount of radiation transmitted to the soil surface appeared to be an important factor determining soil evaporation, even when soil water was not fully available and limiting soil evaporation.
Keyword Barley
Chickpea
Water use efficiency
Transpiration efficiency
Soil evaporation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
 
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