The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia: Convergent clues from epidemiology and neuropathology

Piper, Michael, Beneyto, Monica, Burne, Thomas H. J., Eyles, Darryl W., Lewis, David A. and McGrath, John J. (2012) The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia: Convergent clues from epidemiology and neuropathology. Psychiatric Clinics of North America, 35 3: 571-584. doi:10.1016/j.psc.2012.06.002

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Author Piper, Michael
Beneyto, Monica
Burne, Thomas H. J.
Eyles, Darryl W.
Lewis, David A.
McGrath, John J.
Title The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia: Convergent clues from epidemiology and neuropathology
Journal name Psychiatric Clinics of North America   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0193-953X
1558-3147
Publication date 2012-09
Sub-type Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
DOI 10.1016/j.psc.2012.06.002
Open Access Status File (Author Post-print)
Volume 35
Issue 3
Start page 571
End page 584
Total pages 14
Place of publication Maryland Heights, MO, United States
Publisher W.B. Saunders
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract The neurodevelopmental hypothesis of schizophrenia suggests that the disruption of early brain development increases the risk of later developing schizophrenia. This hypothesis focuses attention on critical periods of early brain development. From an epidemiologic perspective, various prenatal and perinatal risk factors have been linked to schizophrenia, including exposures related to infection, nutrition, and obstetric complications. From a genetic perspective, candidate genes have also been linked to altered brain development. In recent decades evidence from neuropathology has provided support for the neurodevelopmental hypothesis. Animal models involving early life exposures have been linked to changes in these same brain systems, providing convergent evidence for this long-standing hypothesis.
Keyword Epidemiology
Neuropathology
Schizophrenia
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Issue theme: Schizophrenia

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Critical review of research, literature review, critical commentary
Collections: Queensland Brain Institute Publications
Official 2013 Collection
School of Biomedical Sciences Publications
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 32 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
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Created: Wed, 12 Sep 2012, 15:32:43 EST by Dr Michael Piper on behalf of School of Biomedical Sciences