What does personality tell us about working in the bush? Temperament and character traits of Australian remote allied health professionals

Campbell, Narelle, Eley, Dianne and McAllister, L. (2013) What does personality tell us about working in the bush? Temperament and character traits of Australian remote allied health professionals. Australian Journal of Rural Health, 21 5: 240-248. doi:10.1111/ajr.12047

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads

Author Campbell, Narelle
Eley, Dianne
McAllister, L.
Title What does personality tell us about working in the bush? Temperament and character traits of Australian remote allied health professionals
Journal name Australian Journal of Rural Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1440-1584
1038-5282
Publication date 2013
Year available 2013
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/ajr.12047
Volume 21
Issue 5
Start page 240
End page 248
Total pages 9
Place of publication Richmond, VIC, Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing Asia
Collection year 2014
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: To describe the personality (temperament and character traits) of remote Australian allied health professionals (AHPs). Recent research shows that health professionals can be differentiated by personality traits but little is known about the personality traits of AHPs.

Design: Cross-sectional (online) survey design with snowball sampling of participants.

Setting and Participants: Australian AHPs (N=561; women, n=502) classified into Remote (n=266), Not Remote (n=295).

Main outcome measure(s): Demographic variables and the Temperament and Character Inventory (TCI R-140).

Results: Remote AHPs were higher in novelty seeking (P=0.037) and self-transcendence (P=0.042). Remote women were lower in harm avoidance (P=0.042). Older remote AHPS were lower in reward dependence (P=0.001); younger remote AHPs were lower in self directedness (P=0.001) and higher in harm avoidance (P<0.001). Women were more reward dependent (P<0.001) and cooperative (P=0.008) than men.

Conclusions: The sample demonstrated personality trait levels aligned with research on rural doctors and nurses and which might be advantageous for working in a challenging environment. Exploring the more stable nature of temperament traits coupled with the modifiable potential of character traits provides new insight into people who choose to work as a remote AHP. These findings might contribute to a better understanding of the personality trends in these AHPs which might provide clues to improve recruitment and retention strategies.
Keyword Allied health professional
Personality
Recruitment
Remote practice
Retention
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Accepted 28 Aug 2012 ; Forthcoming

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2014 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 6 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 7 times in Scopus Article | Citations
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Sun, 09 Sep 2012, 15:04:24 EST by Diann Eley on behalf of School of Medicine