Adenoviral infection in a collection of juvenile inland Bearded Dragons (Pogona vitticeps)

Doneley, Bob and Buckle, Kelly (2012). Adenoviral infection in a collection of juvenile inland Bearded Dragons (Pogona vitticeps). In: Garry Cross and Robert Johnson, Annual Conference Proceedings: 2012 AVA. 2012 AVA Annual Conference: Australasian Committee Association of Avian Veterinarians and Unusual and Exotic Pet Veterinarians, Melbourme, VIC, Australia, (199-203). 3 - 7 September 2012.

Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Doneley, Bob
Buckle, Kelly
Total Author Count Override 2
Title of paper Adenoviral infection in a collection of juvenile inland Bearded Dragons (Pogona vitticeps)
Formatted title Adenoviral infection in a collection of juvenile inland Bearded Dragons (Pogona vitticeps)
Conference name 2012 AVA Annual Conference: Australasian Committee Association of Avian Veterinarians and Unusual and Exotic Pet Veterinarians
Conference location Melbourme, VIC, Australia
Conference dates 3 - 7 September 2012
Proceedings title Annual Conference Proceedings: 2012 AVA
Place of Publication St Leonards, NSW, Australia
Publisher Australian Veterinary Association
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Fully published paper
Editor Garry Cross
Robert Johnson
Start page 199
End page 203
Total pages 5
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary Adenoviral infection in bearded Dragons was first reported in New Zealand in the early 1980's; a little over a decade later it was reported in the USA and is now considered endemic in that country. Despite a case report describing adenovirus in two individual agamid lizards in Australia, a group outbreak of the disease has not previously been reported in bearded Dragons in Australia, their country of origin.

This case report describes an outbreak of adenoviral disease in juvenile bearded dragons in a breeding collection in south-east Queensland. Lizards aged from 6-10 weeks were presented with neurological signs, poor growth and occasional, deaths. Histopathological examination revealed multifocal nonsuppurative hepatitis associated with 5-lOum diameter, smudgy, basophilic, hyaline intranuclear inclusion bodies which marginated nuclear chromatin. These histological lesions were considered consistent with adenoviral hepatitis.

A review of several on-line reptile forums suggests that adenoviral infection in bearded dragons may be more widespread than reported.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes "Seeing is Believing: Ophthalmology and Current Topics in Birds and Exotics"

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Veterinary Science Publications
 
Available Versions of this Record
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 119 Abstract Views, 4 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Sat, 08 Sep 2012, 14:38:13 EST by Dr Bob Doneley on behalf of School of Veterinary Science