Rationalizing ideologies, social identities and corruption among civil servants in Indonesia during the Suharto era

Budiman, Adang, Roan, Amanda and Callan, Victor J. (2013) Rationalizing ideologies, social identities and corruption among civil servants in Indonesia during the Suharto era. Journal of Business Ethics, 116 1: 139-149. doi:10.1007/s10551-012-1451-y

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Author Budiman, Adang
Roan, Amanda
Callan, Victor J.
Title Rationalizing ideologies, social identities and corruption among civil servants in Indonesia during the Suharto era
Journal name Journal of Business Ethics   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0167-4544
1573-0697
Publication date 2013-08
Year available 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10551-012-1451-y
Open Access Status
Volume 116
Issue 1
Start page 139
End page 149
Total pages 11
Place of publication Dordrecht, Netherlands
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract This study investigated how the social identities assumed by individuals as part of their professional roles influence the nature and use of a range of rationalizations for their corruption or the corrupt acts of others. Thirty senior Indonesian public servants were interviewed about the causes and factors that perpetuated corruption during the Suharto era, and how they rationalized corrupt behavior within the role of being a civil servant. Findings revealed that corruption was routine and embedded in the daily activities and administrative structures of Indonesian public servants. Rationalizing ideologies that supported corruption included a denial of responsibility, social weighting and an appeal to higher loyalties. Central to these rationalizations were explanations around the low levels of civil service salaries, poor accountability, and corrupt leadership at senior levels of the government. However, the expression of these rationalizations varied across three social or role identities of the Indonesian civil servant: the professional civil servant, the collegial civil servant, and the corrupt civil servant. The implications of these findings for interventions in organizations in developing countries are discussed.
Keyword Corruption
Civil service reform -- Indonesia
Rationalization
Role Identity
Develping countries
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online 29 August 2012

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
UQ Business School Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 3 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 3 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Tue, 04 Sep 2012, 13:37:47 EST by Karen Morgan on behalf of UQ Business School