Terrestrial engagements by terminal Lapita maritime specialists on the southern Papuan coast

McNiven, Ian J., David, Bruno, Aplin, Kelly, Mialanes, Jerome, Assmussen, Brit, Ulm, Sean, Faulkner, Patrick, Rowe, Cassandra and Richards, Thomas (2012). Terrestrial engagements by terminal Lapita maritime specialists on the southern Papuan coast. In Simon G. Haberle and Bruno David (Ed.), Peopled landscapes: Archaeological and biogeographic approaches to landscapes (pp. 121-156) Acton, ACT, Australia: ANU E Press.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author McNiven, Ian J.
David, Bruno
Aplin, Kelly
Mialanes, Jerome
Assmussen, Brit
Ulm, Sean
Faulkner, Patrick
Rowe, Cassandra
Richards, Thomas
Title of chapter Terrestrial engagements by terminal Lapita maritime specialists on the southern Papuan coast
Title of book Peopled landscapes: Archaeological and biogeographic approaches to landscapes
Place of Publication Acton, ACT, Australia
Publisher ANU E Press
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
Series Terra Australis
ISBN 9781921862717
1921862718
9781921862724
1921862726
ISSN 0725-9018
Editor Simon G. Haberle
Bruno David
Volume number 34
Chapter number 5
Start page 121
End page 156
Total pages 36
Total chapters 23
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary ln 1974, Peter Kershaw published a paper in Nature outlining a remarkable pollen core
sequence from Lynch's Crater in tropical northeast Qyeensland (Kershaw 1974). From an
archaeological perspective, the most interesting dimension to this work was the novel and
provocative suggestion that the transition from rainforest to sclerophyll forest beginning
around 38,000 BP may have been related to anthropogenic burning of the landscape since Aboriginal colonisation of the continent (Kershaw 197 4,222). In a sense, Kershaw was giving empirical veracity to Rhys Jones's ( 1969) paradigmatic notion of 'fire-stick farming' and the proposition that 'the arrival of Aboriginal man [to Australia] incre.,ed the fire frequency by an enormous amount'. In 1981, Kershaw and colleagues gave further support to the anthropogenic burning interpretation by showing increases in charcoal counts within the Lynch's Crater core coincident with the rainforest-sclerophyll forest transition (Singh et al. 1981). While initially archaeologists were wary of this new and alternative approach to the human past in Australia, by 1993 Kershaw could rightly claim that 'information from some pollen records has been important to the debate on the time of arrival of Aboriginal people' (Kershaw 1993:14). [Introduction extract]
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Book Chapter
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