Hay Cave: A 30,000-year cultural sequence from the Mitchell-Palmer limestone zone, north Queensland, Australia

Lourandos, Harry, David, Bruno, Roche, Nicola, Rowe, Cassandra, Holden, Angela and Clarke, Simon J. (2012). Hay Cave: A 30,000-year cultural sequence from the Mitchell-Palmer limestone zone, north Queensland, Australia. In Simon G. Haberle and Bruno David (Ed.), Peopled landscapes: Archaeological and biogeographic approaches to landscapes (pp. 27-63) Acton, ACT, Australia: ANU E Press.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Lourandos, Harry
David, Bruno
Roche, Nicola
Rowe, Cassandra
Holden, Angela
Clarke, Simon J.
Title of chapter Hay Cave: A 30,000-year cultural sequence from the Mitchell-Palmer limestone zone, north Queensland, Australia
Title of book Peopled landscapes: Archaeological and biogeographic approaches to landscapes
Place of Publication Acton, ACT, Australia
Publisher ANU E Press
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
Series Terra Australis
ISBN 9781921862717
1921862718
9781921862724
1921862726
ISSN 0725-9018
Editor Simon G. Haberle
Bruno David
Volume number 34
Chapter number 2
Start page 27
End page 63
Total pages 37
Total chapters 23
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Hay Cave is one of many limestone caves in the tropical Mitchell-Palmer area of north Queensland. Archaeologically, its major significance is a lengthy, more than 30,000 year-long, cultural sequence, with good preservation of faunal remains as well as stone artefacts and an abundance of rock art. Thus, it offers the opportunity to investigate long-term local archaeological trends in one site and to compare these with regional trends obtained from a wider range of sites throughout this archaeologically rich area (David and Lourandos 1997). How can these long-term cultural trends be characterised from an individual site? In what ways do they reflect wider regional trends and patterns? How,do they compare with palaeoenvironmental trends? And, at a more general level, how can we connect different spatial scales of investigation (the local or site- specific and the regional) when seeking to explore long-term cultural trends? These were the questions guiding the research.
        As a limestone cave with alkaline soils and good preservation, Hay Cave is well endowed in different kinds of archaeological materials, raising also the question of the relationship between different lines of archaeological evidence when exploring cultural trends through time. To what degree does each category of archaeological material represent independent sets of evidence, and to what degree can they be related inter-textually? With such questions in mind, the stone artefacts, animal bone, land-snail shell, mussel shell, brush-turkey egg shell, charcoal and hearths of Hay Cave are examined here in relation to wider regional chronological patterns for Cape York Peninsula (see David and Lourandos 1998). A large number of AMS radiocarbon determinations were obtained to investigate these data in adequate chrono-stratigraphic detail.
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Document type: Book Chapter
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Created: Tue, 04 Sep 2012, 12:15:10 EST by Ms Ramona Hooyer on behalf of School of Social Science