Integration, synthesis and climate change adaptation: A narrative based on coastal wetlands at the regional scale

Burley, Jennifer G., McAllister, Ryan R. J., Collins, Kerry A. and Lovelock, Catherine E. (2012) Integration, synthesis and climate change adaptation: A narrative based on coastal wetlands at the regional scale. Regional Environmental Change, 12 3: 581-593. doi:10.1007/s10113-011-0271-4


Author Burley, Jennifer G.
McAllister, Ryan R. J.
Collins, Kerry A.
Lovelock, Catherine E.
Title Integration, synthesis and climate change adaptation: A narrative based on coastal wetlands at the regional scale
Journal name Regional Environmental Change   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1436-3798
1436-378X
Publication date 2012-09
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s10113-011-0271-4
Volume 12
Issue 3
Start page 581
End page 593
Total pages 13
Place of publication Heidelberg, Germany
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract The idea that integration and synthesis are critical for designing climate change adaptation and mitigation is well entrenched conceptually. Here, we review the concepts of adaptation, synthesis and integration and apply them to the case study of coastal wetlands in South East Queensland, Australia. The distribution and condition of coastal wetlands will change as climate changes. This will create conservation challenges and economic costs, but these can be minimised by drawing from a broad sectoral perspective in undertaking adaptation planning and by ensuring integration into policy. Our review indicates that adaptations to sea level rise that are focussed on wetland and biodiversity conservation are likely to have impacts for urbanisation patterns. Planning regulations that provide spatial buffering around wetlands may give rise to more compact urban forms that may lead to reductions in the cost of defence against sea level rise, reduce energy usage per person and provide more green space. However, more compact urban forms could exacerbate heat island effects and place greater burden on the economically disadvantaged as, for example, single-family homes become more expensive. Planning for climate change needs to balance these equity and cross-sectoral issues in order to reduce the likelihood of unforeseen negative consequences.
Keyword Regional planning
Moreton Bay
Sunshine Coast
Gold Coast
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Published online: 23 December 2011

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 11 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article | Citations
Scopus Citation Count Cited 10 times in Scopus Article | Citations
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Created: Mon, 27 Aug 2012, 10:09:34 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences