Quantification of sewage odours

Koe, Lawrence Choon Chiaw and Brady, D. K. Quantification of sewage odours. St. Lucia: Dept. of Civil Engineering, University of Queensland, 1983.

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Author Koe, Lawrence Choon Chiaw
Brady, D. K.
Title Quantification of sewage odours
Place of Publication St. Lucia
Publisher Dept. of Civil Engineering, University of Queensland
Publication year 1983
Sub-type Other
Series Research report (University of Queensland. Dept. of Civil Engineering) ; no.CE 40.
Language eng
Total number of pages 35
Year available 1983
Subjects 290800 Civil Engineering
Formatted Abstract/Summary

Synopsis

 

It is possible for mixtures of gases to be less odorous than any of their constituents. Because machines cannot replicate this masking phenomenon, odour quantification requires a reliable human nose. An olfactometer measures the amount of dilution with de-odorised air needed to render an odorous sample barely detectable. Because odour sensitivity varies enormously between individuals, each observer must be calibrated with reference to a standard, for which the population's mean sensitivity is now proposed. 

 

Hydrogen sulphide is a common constituent of sewage air, but until now its correlation with sewage odour has proved somewhat elusive. Research on real sewage odours at two sites has now demonstrated that such cor1'elations are quantifiable. These correlations reveal that the H2S in sewage air is naturally odour-masked. Such masking of odours from toxic gases is considered dangerous in certain circumstances. 

Keyword Sewage
Odors
Sewer gas
Q-Index Code AX
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Unknown

 
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Created: Thu, 16 Aug 2012, 11:18:23 EST by Talha Alam on behalf of The University of Queensland Library