An invasive grass shows colonization advantages over native grasses under conditions of low resource availability

Han, Yi, Buckley, Yvonne M. and Firn, Jennifer (2012) An invasive grass shows colonization advantages over native grasses under conditions of low resource availability. Plant Ecology, 213 7: 1117-1130.


Author Han, Yi
Buckley, Yvonne M.
Firn, Jennifer
Title An invasive grass shows colonization advantages over native grasses under conditions of low resource availability
Journal name Plant Ecology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1385-0237
1573-5052
Publication date 2012-07
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1007/s11258-012-0070-0
Volume 213
Issue 7
Start page 1117
End page 1130
Total pages 14
Place of publication Dordrecht, Netherlands
Publisher Springer
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract Increased or fluctuating resources may facilitate opportunities for invasive exotic plants to dominate. This hypothesis does not, however, explain how invasive species succeed in regions characterized by low resource conditions or how these species persist in the lulls between high resource periods. We compare the growth of three co-occurring C 4 perennial bunchgrasses under low resource conditions: an exotic grass, Eragrostis curvula (African lovegrass) and two native grasses, Themeda triandra and Eragrostis sororia. We grew each species over 12 weeks under low nutrients and three low water regimes differentiated by timing: continuous, pulsed, and mixed treatments (switched from continuous to pulsed and back to continuous). Over time, we measured germination rates, time to germination (first and second generations), height, root biomass, vegetative biomass, and reproductive biomass. Contrary to our expectations that the pulsed watering regime would favor the invader, water-supply treatments had little significant effect on plant growth. We did find inherent advantages in a suite of early colonization traits that likely favor African lovegrass over the natives including faster germination speed, earlier flowering times, faster growth rates and from 2 weeks onward it was taller. African lovegrass also showed similar growth allocation strategies to the native grasses in terms of biomass levels belowground, but produced more vegetative biomass than kangaroo grass. Overall our results suggest that even under low resource conditions invasive plant species like African lovegrass can grow similarly to native grasses, and for some key colonization traits, like germination rate, perform better than natives.
Keyword Plasticity
Colonization
Invasive
Growth traits
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Biological Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 07 Aug 2012, 11:22:41 EST by Gail Walter on behalf of School of Biological Sciences