Extreme rainfall and drinking water quality: a regional perspective

Grinham, A., Gibbes, B., Gale, D., Watkinson, A. and Bartkow, M. (2012). Extreme rainfall and drinking water quality: a regional perspective. In: Water Pollution XI. Transaction: Ecology and the Environment. Water Pollution XI: 11th International Conference on Modelling, Monitoring and Management of Water Pollution, New Forest, United Kingdom, (183-194). 10-12 July 2012. doi:10.2495/WP120161

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Author Grinham, A.
Gibbes, B.
Gale, D.
Watkinson, A.
Bartkow, M.
Title of paper Extreme rainfall and drinking water quality: a regional perspective
Conference name Water Pollution XI: 11th International Conference on Modelling, Monitoring and Management of Water Pollution
Conference location New Forest, United Kingdom
Conference dates 10-12 July 2012
Proceedings title Water Pollution XI. Transaction: Ecology and the Environment
Journal name WIT Transactions on Ecology and the Environment
Place of Publication Hants, United Kingdom
Publisher W I T Press
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Fully published paper
DOI 10.2495/WP120161
ISBN 9781845646080
9781845646097
ISSN 1746-448X
1743-3541
Volume 164
Start page 183
End page 194
Total pages 12
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Record high, extreme rainfall intensities were observed in South East Queensland, Australia in January 2011, resulting in drinking water storages above capacity and subsequent floods.

This paper focuses on changes, and subsequent recovery, in water quality due to sediment and nutrient loading associated with these high inflows across the region’s water supplies.

In total, 8 systems were routinely monitored and results indicate that storages with larger and more degraded catchment areas experienced greater declines in water quality relative to storages with smaller, less disturbed catchments.

A case study focussing on Wivenhoe Dam, the primary water supply for the region, revealed large scale sediment inputs to the system, estimated to between 1.5 and 20 million tonnes.

These were accompanied by high nutrient and metal loads, and water column turbidity above water quality guidelines persisted for a period of at least 6 months after inflows.

Given the increased likelihood of such intense inflow events in the future, sound catchment management appears imperative to reduce negative impacts on storage water quality.
Keyword Extreme flooding
SEQ
Sediment loading
Turbidity
Water storage
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Water Pollution XI contains papers presented at the latest (Eleventh) Conference and includes the following topics: Water Quality; Lakes and Rivers; Groundwater and Aquifer Issues; Pollution and Oil Spills; Environmental Monitoring and Control; Wastewater Treatment and Management; Remediation; Emerging Technologies.

Document type: Conference Paper
Collections: School of Civil Engineering Publications
Official 2013 Collection
 
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Created: Sat, 04 Aug 2012, 23:38:32 EST by Dr Alistair Grinham on behalf of School of Civil Engineering