The effects of living distantly from peritoneal dialysis units on peritonitis risk, microbiology, treatment and outcomes: a multi-centre registry study

Cho, Yeoungjee, Badve, Sunil V., Hawley, Carmel M., McDonald, Stephen P., Brown, Fiona G., Boudville, Neil, Wiggins, Kathryn J., Bannister, Kym M., Clayton, Philip and Johnson, David W. (2012) The effects of living distantly from peritoneal dialysis units on peritonitis risk, microbiology, treatment and outcomes: a multi-centre registry study. BMC Nephrology, 13 1: 41.1-41.17. doi:10.1186/1471-2369-13-41


Author Cho, Yeoungjee
Badve, Sunil V.
Hawley, Carmel M.
McDonald, Stephen P.
Brown, Fiona G.
Boudville, Neil
Wiggins, Kathryn J.
Bannister, Kym M.
Clayton, Philip
Johnson, David W.
Title The effects of living distantly from peritoneal dialysis units on peritonitis risk, microbiology, treatment and outcomes: a multi-centre registry study
Journal name BMC Nephrology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1471-2369
Publication date 2012-01-01
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1186/1471-2369-13-41
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 13
Issue 1
Start page 41.1
End page 41.17
Total pages 17
Place of publication London, England, U.K.
Publisher BioMed Central Ltd.
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Background: The aim of the study was to determine whether distance between residence and peritoneal dialysis (PD) unit influenced peritonitis occurrence, microbiology, treatment and outcomes.

Methods: The study included all patients receiving PD between 1/10/2003 and 31/12/2008, using ANZDATA Registry data.

Results: 365 (6%) patients lived 100 km from their nearest PD unit (distant group), while 6183 (94%) lived <100km (local group). Median time to first peritonitis in distant patients (1.34years, 95% CI 1.07-1.61) was significantly shorter than in local patients (1.68years, 95% CI 1.59-1.77, p=0.001), whilst overall peritonitis rates were higher in distant patients (incidence rate ratio 1.32, 95% CI 1.20-1.46). Living 100 km away from a PD unit was independently associated with a higher risk of S. aureus peritonitis (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.64, 95% CI 1.09-2.47). Distant patients with first peritonitis episodes were less likely to be hospitalised (64% vs 73%, p=0.008) and receive antifungal prophylaxis (4% vs 10%, p=0.01), but more likely to receive vancomycin-based antibiotic regimens (52% vs 42%, p<0.001). Using multivariable logistic regression analysis of peritonitis outcomes, distant patients were more likely to be cured with antibiotics alone (OR 1.55, 95% CI 1.03-2.24). All other outcomes were comparable between the two groups.

Conclusions: Living 100 km away from a PD unit was associated with increased risk of S. aureus peritonitis, modified approaches to peritonitis treatment and peritonitis outcomes that were comparable to, or better than patients living closer to a PD unit. Staphylococcal decolonisation should receive particular consideration in remote living patients.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Article number 41

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Medicine Publications
 
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Created: Tue, 31 Jul 2012, 01:58:41 EST by Matthew Lamb on behalf of School of Medicine