Requesting and receiving advice on the telephone: An analysis of telephone helplines in Australia

Emmison, Michael and Firth, Alan (2012). Requesting and receiving advice on the telephone: An analysis of telephone helplines in Australia. In Holger Limberg and Miriam A. Locher (Ed.), Advice in discourse (pp. 213-232) Philadelphia, PA, United States: John Benjamins Publishing Company.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Emmison, Michael
Firth, Alan
Title of chapter Requesting and receiving advice on the telephone: An analysis of telephone helplines in Australia
Title of book Advice in discourse
Place of Publication Philadelphia, PA, United States
Publisher John Benjamins Publishing Company
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Research book chapter (original research)
Open Access Status
Series Pragmatics & Beyond New series
ISBN 9789027256263
9789027273932
9027273936
9027256268
Editor Holger Limberg
Miriam A. Locher
Volume number 221
Chapter number 10
Start page 213
End page 232
Total pages 20
Total chapters 13
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract/Summary This chapter provides an overview of research which has been carried out on the social organization of advice-seeking and advice-giving on telephone helplines. The methodological organization for these comes from Conversation Analysis (CA) and involves the detailed examination of transcripts of actual calls made to a numbers of helplines based in Australia. The defining features of helpline interaction is that advice, help or support is provided in real time over the telephone, rather than via the dispatch of some third party such as the police, ambulance or other emergency service. Drawing on the studies of advice-giving in face contexts in both everyday and institutional settings, a number of research agendas have emerged, documenting how the provision of real-time advice is accomplished and the constraints faced by call takers as a consequence of the institutional mandates which characterise different helplines. Advice-giving is seen as entailing both normativity (actions/courses of conduct should be taken are prescribed) and asymmetry (to the extent that the advice-giver is projected as more knowledgeable than the advice-recipient). The chapter reviews these, and other interactional helpline phenomena, and reflects on their significance for advancing our understanding of advice-giving in contemporary society.
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Book Chapter
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Social Science Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 30 Jul 2012, 13:43:12 EST by Debbie Lim on behalf of School of Social Science