Is the self-reported private health insurance status in the National Health Survey representative of private health insurance coverage in Australia?

Ranmuthugala, Geetha, Brown, Laurie, Thurecht, L and Lymer, S (2010) Is the self-reported private health insurance status in the National Health Survey representative of private health insurance coverage in Australia?. Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health, 34 6: 572-577. doi:10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00626.x


Author Ranmuthugala, Geetha
Brown, Laurie
Thurecht, L
Lymer, S
Title Is the self-reported private health insurance status in the National Health Survey representative of private health insurance coverage in Australia?
Journal name Australian and New Zealand Journal of Public Health   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1326-0200
1753-6405
Publication date 2010-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1111/j.1753-6405.2010.00626.x
Volume 34
Issue 6
Start page 572
End page 577
Total pages 6
Place of publication Richmond, Vic., Australia
Publisher Wiley-Blackwell Publishing
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Objective: This study determines whether the distribution of self-reported private health insurance (PHI) status in the 2004/05 National Health Survey (NHS) is representative of PHI coverage in Australia.
Methods: Weighted estimates from the NHS 2004/05 are compared with PHI status reported for 2004/05 by the Private Health Insurance Administration Council (PHIAC, the independent regulator of the private health insurance industry). PHI status was imputed to children in the NHS based on PHI status of the adult in the household. The two data sources were deemed to be different if the PHIAC results were not within the 95% CI range for the NHS estimate.
Results: PHI status reported in the NHS and PHIAC are generally comparable except for some categories such as hospital cover of males aged 5–9 years and females aged 85 years and older where the NHS estimates are below PHIAC numbers; and males aged 25–29, 35–39, and 50–54 years where the NHS estimates are higher.
Conclusions: The findings suggest that while the NHS 2004/05 estimates may accurately represent coverage in Australia particularly when examined at an aggregated level, there is some variation in the NHS estimates when examined by sex and age group.
Implications: Researchers need to be aware of the potential for sampling and reporting bias to contribute to some misrepresentation of PHI status when using the NHS to generalise to the Australian population. Exploring corrective measures will ensure that the NHS continues to be a valuable data resource for health researchers in Australia.
Keyword Private health insurance
National Health Survey
Benchmark
Validation
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Medicine Publications
 
Versions
Version Filter Type
Citation counts: TR Web of Science Citation Count  Cited 0 times in Thomson Reuters Web of Science Article
Scopus Citation Count Cited 0 times in Scopus Article
Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Created: Tue, 24 Jul 2012, 17:01:53 EST by System User on behalf of Rural Clinical School