Spider-venom peptides that target voltage-gated sodium channels: pharmacological tools and potential therapeutic leads

Klint, Julie K., Senff, Sebastian, Rupasinghe, Darshani B., Er, Sing Yan, Herzig, Volker, Nicholson, Graham M. and King, Glenn F. (2012) Spider-venom peptides that target voltage-gated sodium channels: pharmacological tools and potential therapeutic leads. Toxicon, 60 4: 478-491. doi:10.1016/j.toxicon.2012.04.337

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Author Klint, Julie K.
Senff, Sebastian
Rupasinghe, Darshani B.
Er, Sing Yan
Herzig, Volker
Nicholson, Graham M.
King, Glenn F.
Total Author Count Override 7
Title Spider-venom peptides that target voltage-gated sodium channels: pharmacological tools and potential therapeutic leads
Journal name Toxicon   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 0041-0101
1879-3150
Publication date 2012-09-15
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1016/j.toxicon.2012.04.337
Volume 60
Issue 4
Start page 478
End page 491
Total pages 14
Editor Juan Calvete
Place of publication Kidlington, Oxford, United Kingdom
Publisher Pergamon
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Voltage-gated sodium (NaV) channels play a central role in the propagation of action potentials in excitable cells in both humans and insects. Many venomous animals have therefore evolved toxins that modulate the activity of NaV channels in order to subdue their prey and deter predators. Spider venoms in particular are rich in NaV channel modulators, with one-third of all known ion channel toxins from spider venoms acting on NaV channels. Here we review the landscape of spider-venom peptides that have so far been described to target vertebrate or invertebrate NaV channels. These peptides fall into 12 distinct families based on their primary structure and cysteine scaffold. Some of these peptides have become useful pharmacological tools, while others have potential as therapeutic leads because they target specific NaV channel subtypes that are considered to be important analgesic targets. Spider venoms are conservatively predicted to contain more than 10 million bioactive peptides and so far only 0.01% of this diversity been characterised. Thus, it is likely that future research will reveal additional structural classes of spider-venom peptides that target NaV channels.
Keyword Spider venom
Peptide
Inhibitor cystine knot
Voltage-gated sodium channel
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Special issue: Advancing in Basic and Translational Venomics

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Chemistry and Molecular Biosciences
 
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Created: Wed, 18 Jul 2012, 17:56:06 EST by Professor Glenn King on behalf of School of Chemistry & Molecular Biosciences