Above/belowground feedback may facilitate and sustain mono-dominance on rehabilitated North Stradbroke Island

Audet, P., Gravina, A., Glenn, V., McKenna, P., Vickers, H., Gillespie, M. and Mulligan, D. (2012). Above/belowground feedback may facilitate and sustain mono-dominance on rehabilitated North Stradbroke Island. In: , Life-of-Mine 2012: Conference Proceedings. Life of Mine Conference (AusIMM), Brisbane, Australia, (15-24). 10-12 July 2012.

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Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
Author Audet, P.
Gravina, A.
Glenn, V.
McKenna, P.
Vickers, H.
Gillespie, M.
Mulligan, D.
Title of paper Above/belowground feedback may facilitate and sustain mono-dominance on rehabilitated North Stradbroke Island
Conference name Life of Mine Conference (AusIMM)
Conference location Brisbane, Australia
Conference dates 10-12 July 2012
Proceedings title Life-of-Mine 2012: Conference Proceedings
Place of Publication Carlton North, VIC, Australia
Publisher The Australasian Institute of Mining and Metallurgy (AusIMM)
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Fully published paper
ISBN 9781921522666
Start page 15
End page 24
Total pages 10
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract/Summary A requisite corollary of mineral sand mining on North Stradbroake Island (Queensland (Qld), Australia) has been the progressive rehabilitation of post-mined lands for the revegetation of native subtropical Eucalypt communities. Since 2005, rigorous environmental monitoring has been undertaken to verify the annual development of post-rehabilitated sites. From these longterm analyses, a chronosequence of land revegetation (ranging from three to 26 years postrehabilitation) was developed to examine the rehabilitation trajectories of various post-mined sites in relation to proximal undisturbed locations. Here, we identifi ed that some sites may be deviating from the intended natural analogues as evidenced by the opportunistic colonisation and otherwise ‘invasive’ behaviour of a regionally native species (Black Sheoak − Allocasuarina littoralis), which appear to be displacing the intended Eucalypt varieties. Although it is recognised that the broader data trends correspond to distinct periods of adaptive modifi cations to the implementation of rehabilitation (ie pre- and post-1995), this analysis focuses on further identifying potential above- and belowground feedback mechanisms underlying these divergent ecological outcomes.
Q-Index Code E1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes Conference theme 'Maximising Rehabilitation Outcomes'

 
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Created: Fri, 13 Jul 2012, 20:42:09 EST by Dr Patrick Audet on behalf of Centre For Mined Land Rehabilitation