Mental skills for musicians: Managing music performance anxiety and enhancing performance

Hoffman, Sophie L. and Hanrahan, Stephanie J. (2012) Mental skills for musicians: Managing music performance anxiety and enhancing performance. Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology, 1 1: 17-28. doi:10.1037/a0025409

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Author Hoffman, Sophie L.
Hanrahan, Stephanie J.
Title Mental skills for musicians: Managing music performance anxiety and enhancing performance
Journal name Sport, Exercise, and Performance Psychology   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 2157-3905
2157-3913
Publication date 2012-02
Year available 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1037/a0025409
Volume 1
Issue 1
Start page 17
End page 28
Total pages 12
Place of publication Washington, DC, United States
Publisher American Psychological Association
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted abstract
The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of a short-term mental skills intervention on reducing music performance anxiety and enhancing performance. Thirty-three musicians, including students, amateurs, and professionals, volunteered to participate (ages 19 to 66 years, mean = 42.09, standard deviation = 15.18). Participants were randomly assigned to a treatment group (cognitive restructuring; N = 15) or a wait-list control group (N = 18). A provisionally registered psychologist taught participants mental skills strategies in three 1-hr, psychoeducational workshops. Self-report, behavioral, and physiological indicators of anxiety and performance quality were collected pretest and posttest. Self-report measures were also taken for the treatment group at a 1-month follow-up. We hypothesized anxiety reduction and performance enhancement in the treatment group from pre- to posttest, and that the benefits of treatment would be maintained or strengthened at the 1-month follow-up. Results revealed a significant reduction in self-reported anxiety, a significant increase in performance quality in the treatment group, and a significant decrease in performance quality in the wait-list control group. The follow-up assessment revealed a significant decrease in self-reported anxiety. No other significant differences were observed.
Keyword Music performance anxiety
Performance enhancement
Mental skills
Musicians
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes This article was published Online First September 12, 2011.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences Publications
School of Psychology Publications
 
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Created: Mon, 09 Jul 2012, 14:34:33 EST by Deborah Noon on behalf of School of Human Movement and Nutrition Sciences