A Randomised Controlled Trial of a Cognitive Behavioural Intervention for Difficulties with Affectionate Communication in Children with Asperger Syndrome

Mrs Lize Andrews (2012). A Randomised Controlled Trial of a Cognitive Behavioural Intervention for Difficulties with Affectionate Communication in Children with Asperger Syndrome Professional Doctorate, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
Attached Files (Some files may be inaccessible until you login with your UQ eSpace credentials)
Name Description MIMEType Size Downloads
s4223320_pd_abstract.pdf s4223320_pd_abstract.pdf application/pdf 57.20KB 0
s4223320_pd_totalthesis.pdf s4223320_pd_totalthesis.pdf application/pdf 780.37KB 12
Author Mrs Lize Andrews
Thesis Title A Randomised Controlled Trial of a Cognitive Behavioural Intervention for Difficulties with Affectionate Communication in Children with Asperger Syndrome
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2012-07-06
Thesis type Professional Doctorate
Supervisor Dr Kate Sofronoff
Total pages 108
Total black and white pages 108
Language eng
Subjects 17 Psychology and Cognitive Sciences
Abstract/Summary Abstract Individuals with Asperger syndrome have difficulty understanding, receiving and expressing appropriate forms and levels of affectionate behaviours and this can have a great impact on their lives (Attwood, 2007). The purpose of the current study was to further evaluate the effectiveness of a cognitive-behavioural intervention program (Encouraging Friendship Skills in Children with Asperger syndrome) aimed at improving the affectionate communication and friendship skills in children with Asperger syndrome. The pilot study of this program, conducted by Sofronoff, Eloff, Sheffield and Attwood (2011), was extended in the current study by conducting a randomised-controlled trial of the intervention program. Fifty-eight children with Asperger syndrome (aged 7 to 12 years) were recruited to participate and were randomly assigned to the intervention (n = 29) or waitlist-control (n = 29) condition. Parent-report measures indicated that, relative to the waitlist-control group, children in the intervention group showed significantly greater improvements in the overall appropriateness of their affectionate behaviour to others following the program. More specifically, significant improvements were reported in the appropriate expression of affection to others after the program and this finding was maintained at three month follow-up. In addition, parents reported significant improvements in the communication of empathy to others at follow-up. Children in the intervention group’s understanding regarding the purpose of affection approached significance. Further, no significant change in children’s general difficulties with affectionate behaviour and social competence was reported by parents following the intervention. When data from both conditions were pooled, and greater power was available, results revealed significant improvements in children’s overall affectionate behaviour to others (including giving affection, receiving affection and communicating empathy to others), understanding of the function of affectionate behaviour, social competence and anxiety. Overall, this study indicates that children with Asperger syndrome can be taught to interact more appropriately. The limitations and suggestions for future research are discussed.
Keyword Asperger syndrome
affectionate communication
friendship skills

 
Citation counts: Google Scholar Search Google Scholar
Access Statistics: 171 Abstract Views, 12 File Downloads  -  Detailed Statistics
Created: Fri, 06 Jul 2012, 14:29:25 EST by Mrs Lize Andrews on behalf of Faculty of Social & Behavioural Sciences