Management of hearing aid assembly by urban-dwelling hearing-impaired adults in a developed country: Implications for a self-fitting hearing aid.

Convery, Elizabeth, Keidser, Gitte, Hartley, Lisa, Caposecco, Andrea, Hickson, Louise and Meyer, Carly (2011) Management of hearing aid assembly by urban-dwelling hearing-impaired adults in a developed country: Implications for a self-fitting hearing aid.. Trends in Amplification, 15 4: 196-208. doi:10.1177/1084713811431694


Author Convery, Elizabeth
Keidser, Gitte
Hartley, Lisa
Caposecco, Andrea
Hickson, Louise
Meyer, Carly
Title Management of hearing aid assembly by urban-dwelling hearing-impaired adults in a developed country: Implications for a self-fitting hearing aid.
Journal name Trends in Amplification   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1084-7138
1940-5588
Publication date 2011-12
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1177/1084713811431694
Open Access Status DOI
Volume 15
Issue 4
Start page 196
End page 208
Total pages 13
Place of publication Thousand Oaks, CA, United States
Publisher Sage Publications
Language eng
Abstract A self-fitting hearing aid, designed to be assembled and programmed without audiological or computer support, could bring amplification to millions of people in developing countries, who remain unaided due to the lack of a local, professional, audiological infrastructure. The ability to assemble and insert a hearing aid is fundamental to the successful use of a self-fitting device. In this study, the management of such tasks was investigated. Eighty older, urban-dwelling, hearing-impaired adults in a developed country were asked to follow a set of written, illustrated instructions to assemble two slim-fit behind-the-ear hearing aids. Participants were allowed to access assistance with the task from an accompanying partner. A range of personal and audiometric variables was measured through the use of structured questionnaires and standardized tests of health literacy, cognitive function, and manual dexterity. The results showed that 99% of participants were able to complete the hearing aid assembly task, either on their own or with assistance. Health literacy, or the ability to read and understand health-related text, and gender most strongly influenced participants' ability to complete the assembly task independently and accurately. Higher levels of health literacy were associated with an increased likelihood of independent and successful task completion. Male participants were more likely to complete the task on their own, while female participants were more likely to assemble the device without errors. The results of this study will inform future work regarding development of educational material for the self-fitting hearing aid as well as candidacy for such a device.
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status UQ
Additional Notes First published: December 26 2011.

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collection: School of Health and Rehabilitation Sciences Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 05 Jul 2012, 13:20:15 EST by Dr Carly Meyer on behalf of School of Health & Rehabilitation Sciences