The effects of emotional regulation on employee reactions to perceived organizational injustice

James Ronald Brown (2010). The effects of emotional regulation on employee reactions to perceived organizational injustice Honours Thesis, UQ Business School, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author James Ronald Brown
Thesis Title The effects of emotional regulation on employee reactions to perceived organizational injustice
School, Centre or Institute UQ Business School
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2010-10
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Professor Neal Ashkanasy
Sandra Lawrence
Total pages 59
Language eng
Subjects 1503 Business and Management
Abstract/Summary This thesis contributes to both empirical and theoretical research on affect, emotion regulation and organizational injustice. It provides an integration on the current literature on the above fields of research by using the Affective Events Theory by Weiss and Cropanzano (1996), to explore the effects of emotion regulation on employees' reactions to perceived organizational injustice. Politeness of work requests was used as a dependent variable in this experiment, as a measure of interpersonal communication. Results from the experiment suggests that there were no effects of emotion regulation on employee's politeness of work requests.

 
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Created: Mon, 02 Jul 2012, 13:41:47 EST by Karen Morgan on behalf of UQ Business School