Landing a job as a pilot: How do we come to perceive differential treatment as illegitimate discrimination?

Courtney Youngberg (2011). Landing a job as a pilot: How do we come to perceive differential treatment as illegitimate discrimination? Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Courtney Youngberg
Thesis Title Landing a job as a pilot: How do we come to perceive differential treatment as illegitimate discrimination?
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2011-10-20
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Professor Jolanda Jetten
Total pages 77
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Based on a pilot study, the present research aimed to determine the process by which illegitimate differential treatment comes to be recognised as discrimination. Specifically, the effects of discrimination legitimacy appraisal and advantage or disadvantage as dictated by age on the perception of and reactions to discrimination were assessed. Working adults (n = 157) were engaged in a workplace recruitment scenario with an age-based exclusion criterion in order to test this study's three hypotheses. One hypothesis received partial support, as legitimacy appraisals were found to influence perceptions of and reactions to discrimination. Although age also affected discrimination perceptions and reactions, the direction of results were in opposition to those hypothesised. The final hypothesis was not supported, as the variables of legitimacy appraisal and age were found to operate independently. Findings indicated that unless attention is directed towards the absence of legitimate reasons for exclusion, this absence is unlikely to be noticed. Furthermore, when presented with subtle illegitimate discrimination, by default, we are likely to legitimise and defend its existence, believing it to be fair and just. Additional research examining the ongoing changes in attitudes towards age discrimination is required. These findings hold important implications for recruitment and selection procedures and Affirmative Action policies in organisations.
Keyword Illigitimate differential treatment
Changes in attitudes to age discrimination

 
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Created: Fri, 29 Jun 2012, 15:21:37 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology