Stress or success: The relationship between multiple role occupancy and mental health among emerging adults

Amber Willett (2011). Stress or success: The relationship between multiple role occupancy and mental health among emerging adults Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Amber Willett
Thesis Title Stress or success: The relationship between multiple role occupancy and mental health among emerging adults
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2011-10-12
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Professor Christina Lee
Total pages 83
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary The purpose of this study was to extend previous research investigating the association between multiple role occupancy and mental health to a new population, emerging adults. Specifically, this research examines the relationship between the number of roles that an emerging adult occupies (distinct from the specific type of roles) and mental health, and examines gender differences. Three measures of mental health; life satisfaction, depression and anxiety, are regressed on the number of roles occupied. Separate regression analyses are then conducted for men and women. Participants were 309 first year psychology students, under the age of 30, at the University of Queensland, Australia. Hypothesis 1, based on role enhancement theory, predicted that multiple role occupancy would be linked to better mental health. Specifically, it was predicted that number of roles would be associated positively with life satisfaction and negatively with depression and anxiety. Secondly, based on limited prior research, it was hypothesised that that there would be a difference in the strength of the association between multiple role occupancy and mental heath for men and women: specifically, it was predicted that the relationship would be greater for men than for women. Overall, results revealed support for hypothesis 1, a multiple regression analysis found that life satisfaction, depression and anxiety accounted for a small but significant amount of the variance in the number of roles an individual occupies. Results did not support hypothesis 2, as although a gender difference was found, it was in opposition to predictions: the relationship between the number of roles occupied and mental health was found to be significant for women but not for men. Results are discussed in terms of theoretical and practical applications, limitation and recommendations for future research.
Keyword Multiple role occupancy
Mental health
Emerging adults

 
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Created: Fri, 29 Jun 2012, 14:18:41 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology