Does a history of mild traumatic brain injury affect drivers’ anticipation of traffic hazards?

Zoe Walter (2011). Does a history of mild traumatic brain injury affect drivers’ anticipation of traffic hazards? Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Zoe Walter
Thesis Title Does a history of mild traumatic brain injury affect drivers’ anticipation of traffic hazards?
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2011-10-12
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Associate Professor Mark Horswill
Total pages 107
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Recent evidence suggests that mild traumatic brain injury (MTBI), commonly known as concussion, can negatively affect a cognitive aspect of driving – namely, hazard perception. Furthermore, there has been previous studies have found that having a history of previous MTBI can have a cumulative effect on cognitive performance. Therefore, the aim of the current thesis was to determine if having a history of repeated concussions affects hazard perception. To test this, 166 patients with an MTBI or orthopaedic injury were recruited from the emergency department of a large metropolitan hospital in Brisbane. Participants were given the University of Queensland Hazard Perception Test, and a battery of other measures which included measures of concussion history and potential confounds. Contrary to expectations, there was no effect of MTBI on hazard perception ability. Additionally, no effect of repeated MTBI was found on hazard perception, either during the acute phase or after. This suggests that MTBI may not diminish drivers’ ability to anticipate traffic hazards, although further research is needed.
Keyword Mild traumatic brain injury
Drivers' hazard perception

 
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Created: Fri, 29 Jun 2012, 12:05:54 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology