Here’s looking at you, kid: Perceiver age and the categorization and evaluation of faces that differ in age

Alithea Taylor (2011). Here’s looking at you, kid: Perceiver age and the categorization and evaluation of faces that differ in age Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Alithea Taylor
Thesis Title Here’s looking at you, kid: Perceiver age and the categorization and evaluation of faces that differ in age
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2011-10-12
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Professor Ottmar Lipp
Total pages 76
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Alongside explicit age-based attitudes and beliefs, categorization and implicit evaluation play key roles in the social judgment of others based on age. Although other judgments on key social dimensions such race and gender seem to be driven by ingroup affiliations, research in intergroup relations suggests that age biases do not follow this pattern. The aims of these two experiments were to investigate whether perceiver age influences the categorization and evaluation of faces of different ages, to assess whether these effects were associated equally across various viewer and target age combinations, and to explore the relationship between implicit and explicit age attitudes. In Experiment 1 (N = 29) participants with a mean age of 17.64 years, and in Experiment 2 (N= 24) participants with a mean age of 44.9 years, categorized and evaluated by means of affective priming and implicit association young (17–25 year old) and middle-aged (35–55 year old) faces, and completed self report measures of quantitative and qualitative social contact, ingroup identification, age identity and explicit ageism. The results of these experiments confirms the existence of other age biases in categorization and evaluation, and in both groups this was driven by chronological rather than ingroup biases; while implicit and explicit age attitudes were found largely dissociated.
Keyword Social judgement by age
Implicit and explicit age attitudes

 
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Created: Wed, 27 Jun 2012, 12:06:07 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology