Getting teenagers to cooperate: An evaluation of a brief parenting discussion group for parents of young adolescents

Grace Sweeney (2011). Getting teenagers to cooperate: An evaluation of a brief parenting discussion group for parents of young adolescents Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Grace Sweeney
Thesis Title Getting teenagers to cooperate: An evaluation of a brief parenting discussion group for parents of young adolescents
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2011-10-06
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Associate Professor Alan Ralph
Total pages 94
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Behavioural parenting interventions, such as the Triple P – Positive Parenting Program, are recognised as the most empirically supported approach to addressing adolescent behavioural problems. However, there are still significant barriers preventing parents from accessing such programs, primarily associated with time commitments and financial costs. For parents concerned with their adolescent's mild behaviour problems, brief parenting workshops could overcome these barriers, while providing the support required to prevent the development of more severe difficulties. The current study aimed to evaluate the efficacy of a brief Teen Triple P parenting workshop targeting parents struggling with their adolescent's cooperation behaviour. The study employed a 2 (condition: intervention vs. waitlist control) x 2 (time: pre vs. post) randomised control trial design. Participants were forty parents residing in the greater Brisbane area who expressed concern with their young adolescent's (12-15 years) cooperation. It was hypothesised that from pre to post assessment, participants in the intervention condition would report significantly larger increases in parental self-efficacy, as well as significantly larger decreases in parent-adolescent conflict, dysfunctional parenting practices, adolescent behaviour problems, and parental stress, compared to parents in the waitlist control condition. The primary hypotheses were not supported. However, an exploratory evaluation revealed parents in the intervention condition showed a significant reduction in the use of dysfunctional parenting practices and improvement on individual items measuring parent-adolescent conflict, parenting style, and parental self-efficacy specific to cooperation behaviour. Suggestions for future research include a randomised control trial with greater statistical power, an evaluation of parent and adolescent variables that may mediate the effectiveness of brief parenting interventions, and the development of more appropriate empirical measures to assess changes in mild behaviour problems.
Keyword Triple P for parents of young adolescents
Workshops for mild behavioural problems in teenagers

 
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Created: Wed, 27 Jun 2012, 11:23:43 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology