Does it matter if you’re Black or White? Physiological responses to other race faces

Jesse Smith (2011). Does it matter if you’re Black or White? Physiological responses to other race faces Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Jesse Smith
Thesis Title Does it matter if you’re Black or White? Physiological responses to other race faces
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2011-10-12
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Dr Kimberley Mallan
Total pages 72
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary This body of research investigated whether socially learnt negative evaluation of other race members is the underlying cause of the race bias found during aversive conditioning (Olsson et al., 2005). To investigate this hypothesis the current study manipulated the participant to have a biological conception of race or a social conception of race. This study failed to replicate the race bias in aversive learning and as a result this aforementioned hypothesis could not be verified. Notwithstanding, the study did demonstrate successful alteration of the participant’s conceptions of race in accordance with the prime. Replicating and adding to the current literature (Williams & Eberrhardt, 2008; Keller, 2005), the results suggest that altering an individual’s perception of race changes both their explicit attitudes and implicit evaluations toward other racial groups. Individuals who were primed to have a biological conception of race demonstrated greater negative explicit attitudes and negative implicit evaluations towards other race individuals. These findings may be useful for future applications such as the design of anti-racism campaigns and social frameworks that would aim to sway views of the public and reduce the prevalence of racism within society.
Keyword Physiological responses to other race faces
Race bias

 
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Created: Wed, 27 Jun 2012, 10:00:38 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology