Accentuating the positive: The relationship between meaningful and engaging group activity and wellbeing amongst emerging adults

Oster, Karyn (2011). Accentuating the positive: The relationship between meaningful and engaging group activity and wellbeing amongst emerging adults Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Oster, Karyn
Thesis Title Accentuating the positive: The relationship between meaningful and engaging group activity and wellbeing amongst emerging adults
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2011-10-12
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Professor Christina Lee
Total pages 76
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Positive psychology can be described as the scientific study of well-being. It is important to identify predictors of wellbeing in order to promote interventions which, long term, will decrease pressure on healthcare and social support systems. This study examines the relationship between the wellbeing of emerging adults, and their participation in various pursuits or prosocial groups. Participants were 309 first-year university students (26.6% male, 73.4% female, average age 18.8), who completed an online survey. Three scales that map onto components of wellbeing were used, the Satisfaction with Life Scale, Personal Growth Initiative Scale, and Revised Life Orientation Test (which measures optimism). Participation in faith-based groups, team sports, uniformed groups (e.g., Scouts) and music groups in primary school, high school and currently was reported, together with individual sport and music participation. It was predicted that more participation throughout the lifetime would be associated with higher wellbeing, and that this effect would remain when controlling for SES. This effect was only significant with the Satisfaction with Life Scale, remaining significant when SES was controlled. It was also predicted that this effect would be stronger for group activities than for individual activities, however this difference was non-significant. Finally, it was hypothesised that current involvement would predict wellbeing better than past involvement. It was found that current group involvement was the only significant predictor of life satisfaction, while current individual involvement was the only significant predictor of personal growth initiative. Optimism was not related to any of the predictors. It is concluded that, while the results are not clear cut, group participation or active pursuit of an individual activity may possibly play a role in promoting positive wellbeing amongst some young people. vi Table
Keyword Wellbeing amongst emerging adults
Participation in group activity

 
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Created: Mon, 25 Jun 2012, 15:07:24 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology