Dissociating likability and source monitoring in the hybrid evaluative conditioning source monitoring paradigm with a context effect

Niederberger, Robert (2011). Dissociating likability and source monitoring in the hybrid evaluative conditioning source monitoring paradigm with a context effect Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Niederberger, Robert
Thesis Title Dissociating likability and source monitoring in the hybrid evaluative conditioning source monitoring paradigm with a context effect
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2011-10-12
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Emeritus Professor Mike Humphreys
Total pages 83
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary The underlying mechanism of evaluative conditioning is unknown and continues to be debated. Humphreys, Tangen, Cornwell, Quinn and Murray (2010) proposed that evaluative conditioning is a result of breakdown in memory recall, with recent conditioning interfering with prior memories of an objects valence. This breakdown was a result of valence towards an object, as a result of evaluative conditioning, being stored in episodic memory which interfered with previous information regarding an objects valence. The authors hypothesised that non-valence information about pairs would also be stored in episodic memory. This study aimed to examine the theory of a breakdown in memory access control by testing differences in memory process between likability ratings and source monitoring. Experiment 1 used the hybrid evaluative conditioning source monitoring task (Humphreys et al. 2010) to test dissociation between source monitoring and likability responses, through a context effect. We hypothesised that both source monitoring and likability results would have a context effect. Results found that while there was a trend towards a context in both source monitoring and likability, only with source monitoring could we conclude a possible context effect. It was believed that the lack of significant results in likability ratings of novel brand names did not differ significantly from neutral as a result of the perception that likability ratings were a meaningless task. Experiment 2 addressed the motivation to evaluate a CS by substituting neutral brand names with good-bad words. Replicating the likability condition of experiment 1, we hypothesised that there would be a context effect. However, there was no context effect or evaluative conditioning. The results indicate a demand characteristic that operates when there is no alternative basis for evaluating the likability of words, but disappears when there is an alternative basis for evaluation. We conclude that likability ratings are insufficient in measuring evaluative conditioning because of the demand characteristic influencing the rating.
Keyword Evaluative conditioning
Breakdown in memory recall

 
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