Knowledge is people doing things, knowledge economies are people doing things with better outcomes for more people

Rooney, David, Hearn, Greg and Kastelle, Tim (2012). Knowledge is people doing things, knowledge economies are people doing things with better outcomes for more people. In David Rooney, Greg Hearn and Tim Kastelle (Ed.), Handbook on the knowledge economy, volume two (pp. 1-14) Cheltenham, U.K.: Edward Elgar. doi:10.4337/9781849801744.00007

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Author Rooney, David
Hearn, Greg
Kastelle, Tim
Title of chapter Knowledge is people doing things, knowledge economies are people doing things with better outcomes for more people
Title of book Handbook on the knowledge economy, volume two
Place of Publication Cheltenham, U.K.
Publisher Edward Elgar
Publication Year 2012
Sub-type Introduction, foreword, editorial or appendix
DOI 10.4337/9781849801744.00007
Open Access Status
Series Elgar Original Reference
ISBN 9781849801744
9781781005132
Editor David Rooney
Greg Hearn
Tim Kastelle
Volume number 2
Chapter number 1
Start page 1
End page 14
Total pages 14
Total chapters 15
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Formatted Abstract/Summary
Activities directed at harnessing knowledge for economic and social development have grown since the original edition of the Handbook on the Knowledge Economy (Rooney et al., 2005) was published. Politicians, the world's news media and key people in the Blogosphere now use the terms knowledge economy and knowledge-based economy as part of their normal chatter. More governments are now investing greater amounts of money and time in creating policies to address their knowledge economy goals. The World Bank, the European Union, national governments across the Middle East, Africa, Asia (South Korea, China and India in particular), Australia and the Pacific, Europe and many provincial and local governments are now engaged in knowledge economy policy development. If knowledge economies are about better outcomes for more people, this growth of activity is welcome. Much of what people say in the name of knowledge economies, though, remains short on reality and long on hyperbole arid because of this it is questionable if widespread benefits will result. [Extract]
Q-Index Code B1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Book Chapter
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
UQ Business School Publications
 
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Created: Thu, 21 Jun 2012, 17:13:37 EST by Dr Timothy Kastelle on behalf of UQ Business School