Salt reduction in wheat-based foods – technical challenges and opportunities.

Uthayakumaran, S., Batey, I., Day, L. and Wrigley, C. (2011) Salt reduction in wheat-based foods – technical challenges and opportunities.. Food Australia, 63 4: 137-140.

Author Uthayakumaran, S.
Batey, I.
Day, L.
Wrigley, C.
Title Salt reduction in wheat-based foods – technical challenges and opportunities.
Journal name Food Australia   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1032-5298
Publication date 2011
Sub-type Article (original research)
Volume 63
Issue 4
Start page 137
End page 140
Total pages 4
Place of publication Alexandria, NSW, Australia
Publisher Australian Institute of Food Science and Technology
Collection year 2012
Language eng
Formatted abstract
Reduction of salt (sodium) in the diet is becoming a major public health strategy. Baked products, a specific target of these trends, need salt to enhance taste and to provide functional properties. We report on promising means of maintaining functional properties by substituting alternative salts, wholly or in part. Ammonium and potassium chlorides had dough strengthening effects, comparable to those of sodium chloride, compared to the no-salt control. Extent of strengthening was progressively greater with higher levels of salt addition. Salt related enhancement of dough strength was reflected in finer bread crumb structure and higher loaf volume, even for flour with a high level of fibre.
Keyword Triticum Aestivum
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Provisional Code
Institutional Status Non-UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Non HERDC
Queensland Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation
 
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Created: Thu, 21 Jun 2012, 16:10:54 EST by Colin Walter Wrigley on behalf of Qld Alliance for Agriculture and Food Innovation