Putting value on safety: Organisational culture in a safety context

Kateena Mills (2011). Putting value on safety: Organisational culture in a safety context Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Kateena Mills
Thesis Title Putting value on safety: Organisational culture in a safety context
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2011-10-12
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Associate Professor Julie Duck
Total pages 72
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Organisational culture has been implicated in a number of workplace disasters throughout (Reason, 1990). However, despite some focus on the relationship between isolated elements of culture and safety, there has been little research on the association between commonly perceived organisational culture profiles—e.g human relations (HR), internal process (IP) or rational goal (RG) cultures (the Competing Values Framework; Quinn, 1988; Quinn & Rohrbaugh, 1981)—and safety climate (i.e., perceptions of policies, procedures and practices that signal concern for safety). This research aimed to investigate organisational culture in a safety context using standard measures of organisational culture and safety climate, and a novel measure of culture-driven responses to a hypothetical safety incident. Based on findings by (Colley, Neal, & Lincolne, 2011, unpublished manuscript) we expected results would contrast the role of HR and IP culture in safety climate, the former relating positively and the latter negatively to safety climate. Two studies were conducted with employees in high risk industries. Employees completed standard measures of organisational culture and safety climate at three target levels (co-worker, supervisor, and organisation), as well as a novel measure of organisational culture using a safety incident vignette. As expected, results from Study 1 indicated that perceptions of a positive safety climate were associated with HR culture and with endorsement of HR- rather than IP-focused responses to the hypothetical safety incident. While, Study 2 also indicated a positive association between safety climate and HR culture, it also provided evidence of a positive association between safety climate and IP culture, contrary to predictions. The importance, in theoretical and practical terms, of the role of organisational culture to safety, as well as perceptions of this culture and safety climate across levels in organisations is discussed.
Keyword Organisational culture
Safety context

 
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Created: Wed, 20 Jun 2012, 13:39:39 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology