What's happening to our young men? The mental and physical health of Australian men in emerging adulthood

Juliana McInnes (2011). What's happening to our young men? The mental and physical health of Australian men in emerging adulthood Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Juliana McInnes
Thesis Title What's happening to our young men? The mental and physical health of Australian men in emerging adulthood
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2011-10-07
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Professor Christina Lee
Total pages 88
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Research has consistently shown gender differences in both illness and mortality, such that world-wide, men‘s life expectancy averages four years less than that of women (Population Reference Bureau, 2009), and in developed countries such as Australia, men‘s average lifespan is as much as five years less (Australian Institute of Health & Welfare, 2011). This study examines the health behaviours and emotional wellbeing of male university students, who are negotiating the stage of the lifespan described by Arnett (1995, 2000, 2005) as emerging adulthood, in order to provide some insight into the mental and physical health of young Australian men. Eighty-one male first year university students, aged from 16 to 27, completed an online survey measuring levels of smoking, drinking , exercise, residential status, relationship status and socioeconomic status, together with five indicators of physical and emotional wellbeing. No significant associations were found amongst the variables, despite strong evidence in the literature to suggest that mental and physical health are influenced by variables such as these. A small, biased sample of first year university students from higher SES backgrounds than found in the general population may have influenced the results. Potentially, a larger sample with a greater variation in socioeconomic background may produce different results, supporting those found in previous research. Further, rather than focusing on individual behaviours such as drinking and exercise, the underlying reasons for high levels of psychological distress amongst young men may lie in broader social and cultural factors such as the financial and social pressures experienced by emerging adults. The results highlight the need for further studies on this population, focusing on other social and cultural factors impacting physical wellbeing.
Keyword Impacts on mental and physical health
Young Australian men
Life expectancy

 
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Created: Wed, 20 Jun 2012, 13:24:34 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology