I am calm therefore I can cope: Investigation of the influence of affect valence and arousal on secondary control

Emma Lowery (2011). I am calm therefore I can cope: Investigation of the influence of affect valence and arousal on secondary control Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Emma Lowery
Thesis Title I am calm therefore I can cope: Investigation of the influence of affect valence and arousal on secondary control
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2011-10-12
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Dr Stephanie Tobin
Total pages 85
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary The aim of this study was to investigate the influence of affect valence and arousal on secondary control; the acceptance of and adjustment to existing realities (Morling & Evered, 2006). 79 first year psychology students at the University of Queensland took part in the study voluntarily. Participants were randomly assigned to one of four affect conditions: low arousal positive affect, low arousal negative affect, high arousal positive affect or high arousal negative affect. They were then required to read an article that they had rated as boring, and their responses to questions about the article were used to measure levels of secondary control. It was hypothesised, based on the affect-as-information and affect priming theories, that secondary control would be highest at low arousal positive affective states, and lowest at high arousal negative affective states. Results partially supported this hypothesis, in that secondary control was found to be significantly higher in low arousal conditions, than high arousal conditions. However, contrary to predictions, no significant difference in secondary control emerged between the positive and negative affect valence conditions. Possible explanations for these findings are discussed in terms of the affect-as-information hypothesis.
Keyword Affect valence and arousal
Secondary control

 
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Created: Wed, 20 Jun 2012, 10:30:23 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology