How effective health communication affects maternity care: Testing the linguistic model of patient participation in care

Hannah Kovacs (2011). How effective health communication affects maternity care: Testing the linguistic model of patient participation in care Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Hannah Kovacs
Thesis Title How effective health communication affects maternity care: Testing the linguistic model of patient participation in care
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2011-10-12
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Dr Bernadette Watson
Total pages 81
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary The current project aimed to test an existing communication theory in the context of maternity care in Queensland. Street's (2001) Linguistic Model of Patient Participation in Care (LMOPPC) posits that greater patient participation will improve satisfaction with care and post-consultation health outcomes. The study aimed to provide support for the model, with respect to both the factors predicting patient participation and the outcomes of patient participation. In Study 1, data was collected as part of a larger survey conducted by the Queensland Centre for Mothers and Babies. Participants were women who had a baby in Queensland between February and May 2010 (N = 7194). It was hypothesised that: (1) an older woman with a higher level of education would more actively participate in consultations than a younger woman with less formal education; (2) women with lower levels of anxiety would more actively participate than women with higher levels of anxiety; (3) women with greater knowledge about pregnancy would more actively participate in care than women with less knowledge about pregnancy; (4) patient participation in care would positively predict satisfaction with care; and (5) the relationship between patient participation and health outcomes would be mediated by satisfaction with care. A series of regression analyses were conducted to test these hypotheses. It was found that mother‟s age positively predicted patient participation. Level of education was not found to predict patient participation. Anxiety and knowledge about pregnancy negatively predicted patient participation. The relationship between knowledge and pregnancy was further explored in Study 2, which, owing to the lack of empirical research in the field, posed the research question: what is the effect of different sources of knowledge, and depth of knowledge on patient participation? Results are discussed in terms of the importance of predictor variables, patient participation and satisfaction with care in research and practice.
Keyword Effective health communication
Patient participation in care

 
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Created: Tue, 19 Jun 2012, 14:28:41 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology