Bottlenecks in the brain: An individual differences approach to the relationship between the attentional blink and the psychological refractory period

Elle Jones (2011). Bottlenecks in the brain: An individual differences approach to the relationship between the attentional blink and the psychological refractory period Honours Thesis, School of Psychology, The University of Queensland.

       
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Author Elle Jones
Thesis Title Bottlenecks in the brain: An individual differences approach to the relationship between the attentional blink and the psychological refractory period
School, Centre or Institute School of Psychology
Institution The University of Queensland
Publication date 2011-10-12
Thesis type Honours Thesis
Supervisor Dr Paul Dux
Total pages 95
Language eng
Subjects 1701 Psychology
Abstract/Summary Due to our capacity-limited attentional resources, in any given moment, we are only aware of a fraction of the visual information in our environment. Such capacity limitations are reflected in the Attentional Blink (AB): a deficit in reporting the second of two targets in a Rapid Serial Visual Presentation (RSVP) stream when they appear within 200-500 ms of each other. A secondary deficit occurs at the stage of decision-making: the Psychological Refractory Period (PRP) is a slowing in response time to the second of two (unmasked) targets at short Stimulus Onset Asynchronies (SOAs). These two paradigms have traditionally been investigated separately, however more recent work has examined their relationship. It has been theorised that the AB and PRP may tap a single underlying bottleneck, however non-standard paradigms have been employed, limiting previous studies. The present work used an individual differences approach to assess whether typical AB tasks and a standard PRP paradigm tap the same cognitive limitation. It was observed that while there was high reliability for each task and all tasks correlated on target 1 performance, only the categorical and featural AB magnitudes were related. This indicates that these tasks reflect discrete limitations relative to the hybrid AB paradigm and the visual-manual PRP paradigm. Furthermore this PRP paradigm appears to tap distinct limitations to the AB tasks. These results have important implications regarding theories of temporal attention, as there appears to be multiple bottlenecks of selective attention.
Keyword Individual differences
Attentional blink

 
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Created: Mon, 18 Jun 2012, 13:54:44 EST by Mrs Ann Lee on behalf of School of Psychology