A risky business? Health and physical activity from the perspectives of urban Australian Indigenous young people

Nelson, Alison L., Macdonald, Doune and Abbott, Rebecca A. (2012) A risky business? Health and physical activity from the perspectives of urban Australian Indigenous young people. Health Risk and Society, 14 4: 325-340.


Author Nelson, Alison L.
Macdonald, Doune
Abbott, Rebecca A.
Title A risky business? Health and physical activity from the perspectives of urban Australian Indigenous young people
Journal name Health Risk and Society   Check publisher's open access policy
ISSN 1369-8575
1469-8331
Publication date 2012
Sub-type Article (original research)
DOI 10.1080/13698575.2012.680949
Volume 14
Issue 4
Start page 325
End page 340
Total pages 16
Place of publication Oxon, United Kingdom
Publisher Routldege
Collection year 2013
Language eng
Abstract Being Aboriginal or Torres Strait Islander in contemporary Australia is often discursively constructed in health literature as equating with risks of many kinds. This article explores the ways in which a group of urban Australian Indigenous young people perceive, navigate and articulate the so-called ‘risks' pertaining to issues surrounding their health and physical activity. Eight girls and six boys aged 11–13 years were recruited from an urban school in a major Australian city. Each young person was interviewed up to eight times, using multi-modal tools, over two and a half years, to explore the ways in which they engaged with discourses about health, risk and physical activity. Data were analysed both thematically and through a process of critical discourse analysis. The young people in this study did not perceive themselves as ‘at-risk’ of ill-health despite the recognition of ‘unhealthy’ choices or a family history of chronic illness. They appeared to negotiate risk based on both their knowledge of public health messages and their trust in themselves and those around them. The young people's narratives offer an alternate view to the pathologised, statistical ‘stories’ often representing Indigenous Australians in scientific and popular literature and the media.
Keyword Risk
Risk perception
Public health
Indigenous Australian
Young people
Q-Index Code C1
Q-Index Status Confirmed Code
Institutional Status UQ

Document type: Journal Article
Sub-type: Article (original research)
Collections: Official 2013 Collection
School of Human Movement Studies Publications
 
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